Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Reaching Out to Parents

Drug-Free Tennessee provides materials to educate parents and their children about the hazards of drugs.

This past weekend, Drug-Free Tennessee participated in an annual event for parents of school children, where they distributed copies of The Truth About Drugs booklets to parents, teachers and children alike.

“We need to spread a positive drug-free message to parents and their children,” says Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee, “This is vital to halt drug abuse and especially the opioid epidemic that is sweeping this state and country.”

DFT has been out in the community, handing out information and spreading the word. “Education is the best offense,” says Fesler.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), an international organization based in Los Angeles, and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. At the heart of the campaign are the Truth About Drugs booklets, 13 fact-filled booklets that, without scare tactics, inform about drugs, empowering young people to make their own decisions to live drug-free.


Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs—drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why it is important for all of us to work together .” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org. 

Monday, August 14, 2017

Nashville Religion Communicators Council Announces Interfaith Musical Event for 2018

The Nashville Chapter of the Religion Communicators Council (RCC) has just announced that it will be holding an interfaith musical event in early 2018.


The Religion Communicators Council (RCC), founded in 1929, is an interfaith association of religion communicators at work in print and electronic communication, marketing and public relations. Members of the RCC come from many different religions and backgrounds including Christianity, Judaism, Baha’i Faith, Islam and Scientology, among others.

The Nashville Chapter has just announced that it is planning an interfaith musical event for early 2018.  It promises to bring together people of many different faiths for an event of musical and religious harmony.

Rev. Brian Fesler, president of the Nashville chapter and pastor of the Church of Scientology, says, “It has been a professional and personal mission of mine for some time to bring together people of different religious backgrounds for an awe-inspiring musical production. I couldn’t be more excited that we have now set a date and are beginning to bring key players together for this.”

The event will be called “The Spirit of Harmony: An Interfaith Showcase.” Rev. Fesler says the group will be reaching out to any and all religious people to participate, and he hopes to have a very diverse mix.


“We are reaching out as a chapter,” says Rev. Fesler, “this musical production will highlight a wonderful medium of communication which ties into the very fabric of our city.” For more information, visit religioncommunicators.org/nashville-chapter. 

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Participates in Annual Night Out Against Crime

Drug-Free Tennessee participates each year in National Night Out Against Crime by distributing the Truth About Drugs booklets at neighborhood events.


Drug-Free Tennessee is committed to making neighborhoods drug and crime-free. So it was that volunteers joined community partners, neighbors and police for National Night Out Against Crime to help put an end to rampant crime and drug violations.

National Night Out is meant to stop crime before it starts. It was designed to heighten awareness; generate support for, and participation in, local anticrime programs; strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships; and send a message to criminals letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back, according to natw.org.

This year marks the 35th annual event held to combat drug use and prevent crime, and the 9th year that Drug-Free Tennessee has participated in the Nashville festivities. Neighborhoods frequently celebrate with a mix of food, dancing, information booths and crime forums to help promote safer living.

Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee, says, “Youth today are having to make decisions about drugs at a younger age. We need to get them reliable information so they can make educated choices.”

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, which provides booklets with information on how drugs affect the body and mind, what a dealer might say, and common street names to young people know how to avoid them. The materials are available free of charge, and can be obtained through drugfreeworld.org.

For more information on National Night Out, visit natw.org.  For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee or to order materials, visit drugfreetn.org.

Nashville Church of Scientology Brings People Together for Friendship Day

International Day of Friendship was created to inspire peace and bridge building. The Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville just held its third annual event with a diverse crowd.

Terrorism, shootings, war—it’s become commonplace to hear of these things day after day in a stream of news. Yet, there is a group of people determined to bring people together despite differences of race, color and creed. It all happened at the International Day of Friendship in the community hall of the Nashville Church of Scientology.

International Day of Friendship is an annual observance, dignified in 2011 by the United Nations General Assembly with the idea that “friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities,” according to un.org.  The resolution emphasizes that young people, as future leaders, can be brought together in activities with different cultures. This promotes international understanding and respect for diversity.

The Church of Scientology held its third annual dialogue for the day on August 1st, with community leaders and members coming together to participate. Organizers called for participation from the myriad ethnicities and nationalities that make up the diverse city of Nashville, and held an “International Potluck” as part of the event. “The whole point was to bring a diverse group of people together and demonstrate the power of intentional friendship,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology.

“Most of life’s problems come from a basic misunderstanding of each other, a misunderstanding of intentions.  Getting along with one another starts with getting to know one another,” he says.

The Church of Scientology partnered in this effort with The Way To Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN).  TWTH-TN provides a community betterment program based on the book The Way To Happiness by L. Ron Hubbard. The program is predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. Several concepts in the book promote dialogue and friendship. Among them, “Respect the Religious Beliefs of Others,” “Be Worthy of Trust,” and “Try to Treat Others As You Would Want them to Treat You.”

For more information on the Church of Scientology, its programs or upcoming events, visit scientology-ccnashville.org.