Thursday, July 20, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Helping Neighbors

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is working to help communities across Nashville.

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the movement which is making its way throughout the city of Nashville, Tenn.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events. Volunteers have distributed booklets to households near downtown Nashville, and are planning even more events in the coming months.

"This book is based on common sense principles and acts as a moral compass,” says Judy Young, Director of The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee, “when people read it, they are able to easily put the concepts in it into practice to live a better life.”

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.” In the three decades since it was authored, 100 million copies of the book passed hand to hand.

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org.




Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Human Rights Day Celebration in Tennessee Set for December 7

The committee planning the Tennessee celebration of International Human Rights Day, which takes place in December, has just announced a tentative date for the event.


Each year, Tennesseans gather to celebrate the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations on Dec 10, originally signed in 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“Human Rights Day means acknowledging leaders while encouraging others to take up the torch for the future,” says planning committee chair Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology. The celebration has been tentatively set for December 7, 2017.

The celebration centers around the Human Rights Lifetime Achievement awards, the Rising Advocate Awards, and the Outstanding Service Award.  Last year, Rising Advocate Awards were given to three individuals who have made great strides for human rights and show even greater promise for the future. They were Anna Carella, who has worked both locally and in other parts of the world to help others in need and most recently with Advocates for Women's and Kids' Equality (AWAKE); Justin Jones, a Fisk University senior who has already proven himself as a strong advocate for social justice and peace by organizing several events, marches and protests with the purpose to help others; and Mohamed Shukri-Hassan, who works with the Tennessee Immigrants and Refugee Rights Coalition and American Center for Outreach and was on the first Mayor’s New Americans Advisory Council.

The award winners in the category of Outstanding Service were Juan Canedo for his work on issues that affect the wellbeing of the Hispanic community and the community at large, with particular emphasis on empowering Hispanic immigrants; and Derri Smith, who is the Founder and Executive Director of End Slavery Tennessee.  

The Lifetime Achievement award last year went to Dr. Charles Kimbrough, a longtime civil rights activist who established and organized NAACP chapters in four different cities across the South and served as President of the Nashville Branch, where he saw a surge in chapter membership, addressing civil rights issues within the local African American community.

The committee plans to feature many different human rights organizations during this year’s celebration, especially the Tennessee governmental and non-profit agencies that have commitments to the thirty rights as laid out in the UDHR. Organizations who wish to participate in the planning may contact the organizer through www.nashvillehumanrights.org.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Wants Safe, Crime-Free Neighborhoods

Drug-Free Tennessee participates each year in National Night Out Against Crime by distributing the Truth About Drugs booklets to neighbors.

In the last month alone, there have been nearly one hundred crimes reported by the Nashville police department just in the Edgehill neighborhood. In response, Drug-Free Tennessee will join community partners, neighbors and police for National Night Out Against Crime to put an end to rampant crime and drug violations.

Night Out Against Crime is meant to stop crime before it starts. It was designed to heighten awareness; generate support for, and participation in, local anticrime programs; strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships; and send a message to criminals letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back, according to natw.org.

This year marks the 34th annual event held to combat drug use and prevent crime.  This is the 9th year that Drug-Free Tennessee has participated in the Nashville festivities. Neighborhoods frequently celebrate with a mix of food, dancing, information booths and crime forums to help promote safer living.

Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee, says, “Youth today are having to make decisions about drugs at a younger age. We need to get them reliable information so they can make educated choices.”

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, which provides booklets with information on how drugs affect the body and mind, what a dealer might say, and common street names to young people know how to avoid them. The materials are available free of charge, and can be obtained through drugfreeworld.org.

For more information on National Night Out, visit natw.org.  For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee or to order materials, visit drugfreetn.org.


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Marks International Friendship Day with Dialogue

International Day of Friendship was created to inspire peace and bridge building. At the beginning of August, The Way to Happiness Association is holding a large event with a diverse crowd to dialogue for the occasion.  

Terror attacks on London Bridge, hate crimes on innocent people leaving mosques after Ramadan services, and even attacks in New York's Times Square during a crowded lunchtime -- this is not the news people need to hear on a daily basis. Yet, this is the case in the world today.

To combat events like these, the The Way to Happiness Association will be holding an event with dialogue and activity aimed at raising awareness and friendship among even the most diverse peoples for International Day of Friendship, an observance dignified in 2011 by the United Nations General Assembly. The day was created with the idea that “friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities,” according to un.org.

The resolution emphasizes that young people, as future leaders, can be brought together in activities with different cultures. This promotes international understanding and respect for diversity.

The Way to Happiness is holding the third annual observance in Nashville on August 1st to help people learn about those with whom they might not otherwise associate. The event will be held in the community hall of the Nashville Church of Scientology. Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church says, “This event is needed. There are too many problems arising from basic misunderstanding that could be cleared up with honest and open communication.”

The Way to Happiness is a community betterment program that the Church of Scientology is involved with, as it is based on the book of the same name by L. Ron Hubbard.  The program is predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. Several concepts in the book promote dialogue and friendship. Among them, “Respect the Religious Beliefs of Others,” “Be Worthy of Trust,” and “Try to Treat Others As You Would Want them to Treat You.”

For more information on The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee, visit twthtn.org.

Hubbard Dianetics Seminar Unlocks True Potential

The Hubbard Dianetics Foundation offers a weekly seminar to help people resolve problems, discover the source of unreasonable fears and insecurities, and overcome barriers in life.


What is a person’s true potential, and how could they possibly achieve it? This question has been answered time and again through Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

Since 1985, people from Nashville and Middle Tennessee have found answers about the mind and have been trained in highly effective techniques to resolve unwanted conditions in their lives, thereby unlocking their full potential. It’s all happened at the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, a department within the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville.

Dianetics is defined as “what the soul is doing to the body through the mind,” and the subject explains how the mind contains a hidden influence that will cause individuals to perform the most insane acts. The techniques of Dianetics were developed by L. Ron Hubbard in the early part of the last century and presented to the world in the bestselling self-help book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

While Dianetics is over sixty years old, this Dianetics seminar is new. It is based on the book and a video series, How to Use Dianetics, consisting of 18 short films which illustrate specific Dianetics principles and techniques. With these films, people new to the subject can easily learn what to expect from a Dianetics session and how to help another using this technology. “The seminar not only helps people become aware of the cause of their problems, but also the ability to handle it,” says the seminar director.

Following the presentation of the first of these films, those attending the seminar immediately put the materials to use, working with other attendees to apply the techniques right there on the spot.  Supervised by trained Dianetics specialists, the seminar participants gain first-hand experience with just how easy it is to resolve the difficulties and pain that life leaves in its wake. Church pastor Rev. Brian Fesler says, “Many people have finished this seminar, and I want everyone to experience the benefits of Dianetics.  It’s not just for members of my church—anyone can have it.”

The two-day Dianetics seminar is offered every weekend at the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville at 1130 8th Avenue South. For more information, visit www.dianetics.org or call the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation at 615-687-4600.

Monday, July 3, 2017

Tennessee United for Human Rights Announces Event for Peace Day 2017

The Tennessee chapter of United for Human Rights (TNUHR) is making plans for International Peace Day on September 21st.

International Day of Peace was declared by the United Nations General Assembly as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples. This is more relevant than ever, and human rights activists are planning a large event for the occasion in Nashville on September 21st at the Church of Scientology.

Tennessee United for Human Rights (TNUHR) is sponsoring the event.  TNUHR is a chapter of the international organization United for Human Rights, formed on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to provide human rights resources and educational materials to all sectors of society.

This is the third annual observance of Peace Day by TNUHR. In 2015, the group organized an eye-opening panel discussion on “Exposing the Hidden World of Human Trafficking,” and in 2016, TNUHR held an event under the theme “Know Your Rights and Survive: Overcoming Domestic Violence.” Expert panelists spoke about human rights abuses, how to recognize signs of violence and trafficking and how to help someone who may be a victim.

This year, the Peace Day event will be held on September 21st from 4-6pm in the Nashville Church of Scientology community hall under the theme “Immigration at the Founding of Our Nation.”

Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator of the Tennessee United for Human Rights program says, “We are inspiring peace and educating people about their basic rights. With this knowledge, we can work together to end violence in this country.” For more information about the events on Peace Day or to find out more about Tennessee United for Human Rights, visit tnuhr.org.


Friday, June 30, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Advocates Importance of Friendship and Bridge Building

International Day of Friendship was created to inspire peace and bridge building. At the beginning of August, the Church of Scientology will bring together a diverse crowd to dialogue for the occasion a third time. 

The 2016 Friendship Day Event
Terrorism, shootings, war—it’s become commonplace to hear of these things day after day in a stream of news. Yet, there is a group of people determined to bring people together despite differences of race, color and creed. It’s all happening at the International Day of Friendship dialogue at the beginning of August in the community hall of the Nashville Church of Scientology.

International Day of Friendship is an annual observance, dignified in 2011 by the United Nations General Assembly with the idea that “friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities,” according to un.org.  The resolution emphasizes that young people, as future leaders, can be brought together in activities with different cultures. This promotes international understanding and respect for diversity.

The Church of Scientology will hold its third annual dialogue for the day at the beginning of August, with several community leaders coming together to participate. Organizers want to get as many ethnicities into one room as possible, so are holding an “International Potluck” as part of the event. “The whole point is bringing a diverse group of people together to talk about things that matter in the hopes that this will spread throughout our community,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology.

“There are so many problems in the world today caused by a basic misunderstanding of each other. If we learn something about other people we might end these problems, disputes and upsets altogether,” he says.

The Church of Scientology is partnering for this effort with The Way To Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN).  TWTH-TN provides a community betterment program based on the book The Way To Happiness by L. Ron Hubbard. The program is predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. Several concepts in the book promote dialogue and friendship. Among them, “Respect the Religious Beliefs of Others,” “Be Worthy of Trust,” and “Try to Treat Others As You Would Want them to Treat You.”

For more information on the Church of Scientology, its programs or upcoming events, visit scientology-ccnashville.org.