Thursday, June 22, 2017

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Participates at Event for Father’s Day

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work to spread information to parents on their basic rights so they can help their children. 

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) is working to educate parents on their basic rights as they relate to their children’s mental health and well-being. To do this, volunteers have been to several recent events and informational fairs, and now have recently participated in Father’s Day celebrations in Nashville.

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

During a local event for Father’s Day, volunteers were able to distribute materials and talk with parents about their rights.

Rev. Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out, but there is so much work to be done. People are getting hurt every day at the hands of psychiatrists.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Helps Fathers with Truth

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World. Recently, volunteers were getting out information during a Father’s Day celebration.  


“When it comes to people’s lives being ruined by drugs and addiction, the news is just non-stop,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” he says.

For this very reason, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) was out in the neighborhood for a Father’s Day celebration this past weekend distributing materials and spreading the word. “Fathers are an important role model and it’s incredibly important that they get the truth about drugs so they can pass this on to their children,” says Fesler.

During the event, volunteers were able to distribute dozens of pamphlets and informational brochures to parents and children.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.”

For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org.


The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Helps Fathers Learn Values

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee participated in a celebration for Father’s Day.

“Honor and Help Your Parents,” is but one precept from the common sense guide The Way to Happiness, but it is with this in mind that volunteers from The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee were out in the community for a Father’s Day celebration to distribute copies of the booklet to parents and children alike.

The Way to Happiness, which was written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, sparked a movement and has been reprinted and passed hand to hand to a wide variety of cultures and peoples.

In Tennessee, The Way to Happiness Association has been working to spread its message even further. The reason? Organizers for the group say where it is distributed crime rates plummet, as proven by statistics.

“This book spreads a calmness that is unparalleled by anything else. It contains common sense moral messages that anyone can agree with and apply,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, the regional coordinator for the program.

During the Father’s Day event in Nashville, The Way to Happiness Volunteers were able to see dozens of parents and children and get them their copy of the booklet

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.” Acting as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, the Way to Happiness Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.

To date, some 100 million copies of The Way to Happiness have been distributed in more than 114 languages and in over 170 countries. For more information, visit twthtn.org.


Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Nashville Religion Communicators Council Sets August Meeting

The Nashville Chapter of the Religion Communicators Council (RCC) has just set an August business meeting to form a nominating committee for chapter officers. 


The Religion Communicators Council (RCC), founded in 1929, is an interfaith association of religion communicators at work in print and electronic communication, marketing and public relations. Members of the RCC come from many different religions and backgrounds including Christianity, Judaism, Baha’i Faith, Islam and Scientology, among others. 

The Nashville Chapter has just announced that it will hold an August business meeting, in part to select a nominating committee which will be charged with creating a slate of officers for a 2018-2019 term.

Since 2014, the Nashville executive committee has consisted of Rev. Brian Fesler, Pastor of the Church of Scientology, as President; Drew Pope, former Public Affairs Director for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints as Vice President for Programs; Royya James, Conference Relations Coordinator of United Methodist Communications as Treasurer; Julie Brinker, Director of Community Affairs for the Church of Scientology as Communications Coordinator; and Aisha Lbhalla of the Tennessee Muslim Women’s Council as Membership Officer. 

Rev. Fesler says, “Our chapter has thrived with this diverse group of religious leaders, but now it is time to see who else in the Nashville community would like an opportunity to lead this excellent group of religious communicators. Nashville is filled with potential, especially in the ever-growing diversity of the city which includes the religious sector, and I think there are many who would like to take the helm of this organization to help it grow into the future.” 

Since 2015, the Nashville chapter has met every other month with a series called “Building Bridges Over Bagels,” during which members would discuss current issues of interest to people of faith and what they could do to overcome division together. This series proved very popular with members, and is something Fesler says he would like to see the next administration build on and carry forward. 

For more information or to attend an upcoming meeting, visit religioncommunicators.org/nashville-chapter. 


Citizens Commission on Human Rights Helping Fathers

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work spreading information to parents on their basic rights so they can help their children. 

This past weekend, Metro Nashville Public Schools recognized males and the positive impact they make in the lives of children every day with a Fatherhood Festival. The event welcomed MNPS fathers, grandfathers, uncles, brothers, mentors and other men to spend a day of family fun including games, activities, music and food at the event. The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) took part in the event with a booth to help educate parents on their basic rights related to children’s mental health and well-being. 

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Rev. Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are eager to spread the word to everyone to know their mental health rights, as there is so much abuse in this field. People are getting hurt every day at the hands of psychiatrists.”

Volunteers at the Fatherhood Festival reached scores of parents and community and political leaders. “Our volunteers will go anywhere, and see anyone to spread the word. Just contact us if you would like more information,” says Fesler. 

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Prepares for Third Annual Friendship Day Dialogue

International Day of Friendship was created to inspire peace and bridge building. At the end of July, the Church of Scientology will bring together a diverse crowd to dialogue for the occasion. 
  
Terror attacks in London, Iran, Manchester – this is not the news people need to hear on a daily basis. Yet, this is the case in the world today.

To combat events like these, the Nashville Church of Scientology is working with other churches and community organizations to plan an event with dialogue and activity aimed at raising awareness and friendship among even the most diverse peoples.

The occasion is the International Day of Friendship, an observance dignified in 2011 by the United Nations General Assembly with the idea that “friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities,” according to un.org.

The resolution emphasizes that young people, as future leaders, can be brought together in activities with different cultures. This promotes international understanding and respect for diversity.

The Church of Scientology will hold its third annual dialogue for the day at the end of July, and will help people participate and learn about those with whom they might not otherwise associate.

Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology says, “This event is needed. There are too many problems arising from basic misunderstanding that could be cleared up with honest and open communication.”

The Church of Scientology is involved in this effort through its community betterment program, The Way to Happiness. Based on the book of the same name by L. Ron Hubbard, the program is predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. Several concepts in the book promote dialogue and friendship. Among them, “Respect the Religious Beliefs of Others,” “Be Worthy of Trust,” and “Try to Treat Others As You Would Want them to Treat You.”


For more information on the Church of Scientology, its programs or upcoming events, visit scientology-ccnashville.org. 

Tennessee Scientologist Works to Combat Drug Abuse

Scientologists are standing up against rampant drug abuse, and providing educational materials to prevent an epidemic.

There is a public health crisis in Tennessee: prescription drug abuse. According to a Tennessean article from last month, there are now more opioid prescriptions than there are people in the state, making it the second highest rate of prescriptions per capita in the nation. And if that sounds like bad news, that’s not even the worst of it. Overdose death has gone up 300% over the last two decades, with nearly 1500 deaths in 2015 alone.

That is why Tennessee Scientologist Brian Fesler is working with Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) to prevent drug abuse and educate young people before it is too late.



Fesler, regional coordinator for DFT, said, “We are working to prevent an epidemic, but we will need all shoulders to the wheel if we are going to make an effective change.”  The organization is planning a series of events throughout summer to educate people on the dangers of street drugs. Insiders are calling it a “summer slam on drug abuse.”

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has the mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. While FDFW is not a religious organization, many Scientologists support it, as it is a core belief of the Scientology religion to be free of drugs.

Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee and to follow the events throughout the summer, visit drugfreetn.org.