Thursday, October 12, 2017

Tennessee Human Rights Day Planning Committee Calls for Student Participation

The Tennessee Celebration of International Human Rights Day will take place on December 7, 2017 at the John Seigenthaler Center.

For the past decade, Tennessee has held events each year to observe International Human Rights Day, and since 2011, the event has asked for student participation in the form of art. This has included visual art, computer graphics and spoken word presentations. This year, the committee wants students to come together for a theatrical piece to demonstrate freedom of expression.

According to a new page up at nashvillehumanrights.org, “Student actors and performers are being called to participate in the Tennessee Celebration of Human Rights Day by creating a short theatrical presentation to make the audience think.” From there, students are able to submit their name and information for consideration to participate in this way.

“This is a great way to include college age students in human rights day,” says planning committee chair, Rev. Brian Fesler who pastors the Church of Scientology. “We are still asking middle and high school level students to submit visual artistic presentations,” he says, “but wanted to expand student participation this year.”

The Tennessee Celebration of Human Rights Day brings attention and awareness to key topics, and uplifts human rights leaders who deserve recognition for their accomplishments.

Human Rights Day celebrates the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations, originally signed on Dec 10, 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“It’s our intention to foster hope for new generations while celebrating the strides we’ve made,” says Rev. Fesler. The celebration is set for December 7, 2017.

For more information on the event or to participate, visit www.nashvillehumanrights.org.


Drug-Free Tennessee Helping Kids Understand the Truth

Drug-Free Tennessee, the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, has been helping students across the state to learn the harmful effects of drugs before they are lured into taking them.

With drug-related crimes being a weekly occurrence, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) is working out ways to combat usage rates by spreading truth. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” says Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee.

Volunteers have been out in the community, handing out information and giving talks to students in schools. “It works with anyone of any race or creed, as drugs don’t discriminate,” according to Fesler.

Recently, the group visited schools in Davidson and Rutherford Counties where they delivered talks to students, showed educational videos and gave out the Truth About Drugs booklets.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), an international organization based in Los Angeles, and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. At the heart of the campaign are the Truth About Drugs booklets, 13 fact-filled booklets that, without scare tactics, inform about drugs, empowering young people to make their own decisions to live drug-free.


Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs—drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why it is important for all of us to work together to end this epidemic.” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org. 

5 Tips to Overcome Attention Issues at Mental Health Day 'Lunch and Learn'

Mental health watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights educated parents on how to help children with attention issues. The presentation was a "lunch and learn" seminar at the Nashville Church of Scientology.

The Nashville chapter of the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) held a "lunch and learn" to educate parents on how to help their children overcome "attention deficit" issues without harmful drugs. The seminar was held Oct. 10 in honor of World Mental Health Day.

Dr. David Morris of Magnolia Medical Center gave a presentation titled How to Help Children with Attention Issues. It covered five simple ways a parent can help their child overcome attention issues and achieve better mental health in general:

1) Making sure the child has good nutrition
2) Correcting any vitamin or nutrient deficiencies
3) Discovering and eliminating any food from their diets that they may be sensitive to
4) Seeing that they get proper exercise
5) Getting the help they need to study properly, so their attention isn’t so easily hijacked by other things when they are sitting in class

"I'm not telling you it will be easy to change their diet or make sure they don’t play video games all day, but it’s worth it to help them achieve a better state of mental health," said Dr. Morris. He pointed out that the psychotropic drugs prescribed to children for attention difficulties have very dangerous side effects, so whatever parents can do to get these five points in with their children is very well worth the effort.

"We are proud to host this program to educate our community on these simple actions parents can take to help their children," said Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Scientology Church. "We want to thank Dr. Morris for sharing this vital information." He also invited those attending to learn the truth about psychotropic drugs by touring the Citizens Commission on Human Rights displays in the Church’s Public Information Center.

Citizens Commission on Human Rights is a nonprofit mental health watchdog, responsible for helping to enact more than 180 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive practices. CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including but not limited to full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.


CCHR was co-founded in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and professor of psychiatry Dr. Thomas Szasz.

Alerted to the brutality of psychiatric treatment by author and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard who wrote extensively about the abuses of psychiatric patients, CCHR today stands as a powerful voice of reason for those abused and continues its advocacy for reforms. For more information visit the CCHR website.
For more information, visit the Scientology Newsroom.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Tennessee Human Rights Day to Be Held on December 7th at First Amendment Center

The Tennessee celebration of International Human Rights Day will take place on December 7th this year at the John Seigenthaler Center.

For the past decade, Tennessee has held events each year to observe International Human Rights Day, and since 2014, the event has been held at the First Amendment Center, inside the John Seigenthaler Center in Nashville, Tenn.

Whether you’re reading about fair housing, racial disparities or gender equality, these are all human rights issues. The Tennessee Celebration of Human Rights Day brings attention and awareness to key topics, and uplifts human rights leaders who deserve recognition for their accomplishments.

Human Rights Day celebrates the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations, originally signed on Dec 10, 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“It’s our intention to foster hope for new generations while celebrating the strides we’ve made,” says planning committee chair Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology. The celebration is set for December 7, 2017.

The celebration centers around the Human Rights Lifetime Achievement awards, the Rising Advocate Awards, and the Outstanding Service Award.  


The committee plans to feature many different human rights organizations during this year’s celebration, especially government agencies and non-profit organizations in Tennessee that have commitments to some part of the thirty rights as laid out in the UDHR. Organizations who wish to participate in the planning may contact the organizer through www.nashvillehumanrights.org. 

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Educates Parents of Children with Attention Issues

Mental health watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights will be holding a lunch and learn to help educate parents of children with attention issues during World Mental Health Day in October.


The Nashville Chapter of the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) has just announced that it will be holding a lunch and learn to help educate parents on how to handle children with attention issues in observance of World Mental Health Day in October.

Last year, CCHR held a similar workshop to help parents learn how to raise healthy children. Working with Dr. Elizabeth “Liz” Pendergrass of Rock Springs Family Chiropractic who is also a Maximized Living professional, the organization was able to bring awareness to several parents on children’s mental and physical health needs.

CCHR is determined to help educate people, especially parents, on their rights. “It’s important to us that parents know the dangers of psychiatric drugs, as well as the other options available to them so that their children lead happy and healthy lives,” says Meg Epstein, Executive Director of the Nashville CCHR Chapter.

Dr. Pendergrass laid out what to do if a child is experiencing a variety of health issues, and what parents can do to help their children be at a more optimum health level. She discussed societal norms where people are given a pill, and how that merely masks the problem without fixing it. Then she gave the five steps to maximize health, and how to really help children lead healthy lives.

For this year’s workshop, titled “How to Help Children with Attention Issues: 5 Things You Need to Know,” parents will be oriented to five key facts they need in helping their children to be more able to focus. The workshop will be delivered in part by a representative of CCHR and Dr. David Morris of Magnolia Medical Center. Those interested in attending can find more information and register at cchr2017.eventbrite.com.

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health industry watchdog whose mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health.  It works to ensure patient and consumer protections are enacted and upheld as there is rampant abuse in the field of mental health.  In this role, CCHR has helped to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive mental health practices since it was formed five decades ago. For more information on CCHR, visit cchrnashville.org.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Distributes Booklet to Neighbors and Children

Crime and immorality can only be stopped with peace and common sense. And with the need rising ever higher, The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is eager to make this change.

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the international movement which is spreading throughout Nashville, TN.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events. Just this past weekend, the group was in the community at a back-to-school fair distributing dozens of copies of the booklet.

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.”

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. It is the local chapter of The Way to Happiness Foundation, which is based in Los Angeles and acts as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, according to thewaytohappiness.org.

The Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.

To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org.


Tennessee United for Human Rights Says Freedom of Religion is Key to Peace

Tennessee United for Human Rights has a mission to bring human rights education to everyone. And what better way to do this than through discussing these rights at public events? The group has held an event for International Day of Peace for the past two years and will be holding an event again this year on September 21.

International Day of Peace was declared by the United Nations General Assembly as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples. This is more relevant than ever, and TNUHR is planning an event under the heading “Religious Freedom and What this Means Today.”

This is the third annual observance of Peace Day by TNUHR. In 2015, the group organized an eye-opening panel discussion on “Exposing the Hidden World of Human Trafficking,” and in 2016, TNUHR held an event under the theme “Know Your Rights and Survive: Overcoming Domestic Violence.” Expert panelists spoke about human rights abuses, how to recognize signs of violence and trafficking and how to help someone who may be a victim.

This year, the Peace Day event will be held on September 21st at 7pm in the Nashville Church of Scientology community hall.

Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator of the Tennessee United for Human Rights program says, “We want to inspire peace and educate people about their basic rights. With this knowledge, we can work together to end violence in this country.”


TNUHR is a chapter of the international organization United for Human Rights, formed on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to provide human rights resources and educational materials to all sectors of society. For more information about the events on Peace Day or to find out more about Tennessee United for Human Rights, visit tnuhr.org.