Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Distributes Booklet to Neighbors and Children

Crime and immorality can only be stopped with peace and common sense. And with the need rising ever higher, The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is eager to make this change.

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the international movement which is spreading throughout Nashville, TN.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events. Just this past weekend, the group was in the community at a back-to-school fair distributing dozens of copies of the booklet.

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.”

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. It is the local chapter of The Way to Happiness Foundation, which is based in Los Angeles and acts as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, according to thewaytohappiness.org.

The Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.

To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org.


Tennessee United for Human Rights Says Freedom of Religion is Key to Peace

Tennessee United for Human Rights has a mission to bring human rights education to everyone. And what better way to do this than through discussing these rights at public events? The group has held an event for International Day of Peace for the past two years and will be holding an event again this year on September 21.

International Day of Peace was declared by the United Nations General Assembly as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples. This is more relevant than ever, and TNUHR is planning an event under the heading “Religious Freedom and What this Means Today.”

This is the third annual observance of Peace Day by TNUHR. In 2015, the group organized an eye-opening panel discussion on “Exposing the Hidden World of Human Trafficking,” and in 2016, TNUHR held an event under the theme “Know Your Rights and Survive: Overcoming Domestic Violence.” Expert panelists spoke about human rights abuses, how to recognize signs of violence and trafficking and how to help someone who may be a victim.

This year, the Peace Day event will be held on September 21st at 7pm in the Nashville Church of Scientology community hall.

Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator of the Tennessee United for Human Rights program says, “We want to inspire peace and educate people about their basic rights. With this knowledge, we can work together to end violence in this country.”


TNUHR is a chapter of the international organization United for Human Rights, formed on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to provide human rights resources and educational materials to all sectors of society. For more information about the events on Peace Day or to find out more about Tennessee United for Human Rights, visit tnuhr.org. 

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Nashville Mental Health Exhibition Exposes Dangers of Psychiatric ‘Treatments’

The public must be informed of the effects of mental health drugs, say experts speaking at the exhibition’s opening.

An exhibition exposing the hidden agendas and dangers of the psychiatric industry opened in North Nashville this week. Called “Psychiatry: An Industry of Death,” the exhibition, organized by the psychiatric watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), raises public awareness and exposes the lack of transparency in the field of mental health, where so often only selective data is made available to patients.

At the opening of the exhibition, the theme was “breaking the chains of oppression” and speakers spoke of the need for informed consent in relation to mental treatment. Display panels in the exhibition pointed to information that many in the psychiatric industry choose to ignore, such as the aggression, violence and suicidal thoughts that so often result from prescribed drugs such as antidepressants.

The first speaker, Dr. David Morris, a chiropractor and owner of Magnolia Medical Center, spoke to the extensive drugging and abuse of children in the psychiatric industry and encouraged all attendees to consult a licensed medical professional any time they receive a “diagnosis” from a psychiatrist.

Keynote speaker at the opening, Bishop Marcus Campbell, pastor of Mount Carmel Baptist Church, admonished everyone to look for themselves and said, “We all perish for lack of knowledge,” before urging attendees to tour the exhibit.

The issue of informed consent was highlighted in relation to children and adolescents. Part of the exhibition focused on needless young deaths that could have been avoided if parents had been fully informed about the effects of psychiatric drugs. A majority of so-called “schoolyard shootings” resulting in hundreds of fatalities were shown to have been connected to mind-altering prescription drugs.

Kalee Madorin, spokesperson for the Nashville CCHR Chapter, reinforced the words of the speakers, “Psychiatrists constantly show off their failures in order to get more government funding. They aren’t looking for—and don’t want to find—a cure for mental illness because the money they are making is now in the trillions.”

CCHR is an international psychiatric watchdog group co-founded in 1969 by members of the Church of Scientology and the late professor of psychiatry, Dr. Thomas Szasz. For more information, visit cchrnashville.org.

Monday, September 4, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Changing Lives

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the international movement which is spreading throughout Nashville, TN.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events.

"This book is based on common sense principles and acts as a moral compass,” says Judy Young, Director of The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee, “when people read it, they are able to easily put the concepts in it into practice to live a better life.”

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.”

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. It is the local chapter of The Way to Happiness Foundation, which is based in Los Angeles and acts as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, according to thewaytohappiness.org.

The Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.

To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org.

Hubbard Dianetics Seminar Taps Into Man’s Full Potential

The Hubbard Dianetics Foundation offers a weekly seminar to help people resolve problems, discover the source of unreasonable fears and insecurities, and overcome barriers in life.

What is a person’s true potential, and how could they possibly achieve it? This question has been answered time and again through Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

Since 1985, people from Nashville and Middle Tennessee have found answers about the mind and have been trained in highly effective techniques to resolve unwanted conditions in their lives, thereby unlocking their full potential. It’s all happened at the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, a department within the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville.

Dianetics is defined as “what the soul is doing to the body through the mind,” and the subject explains how the mind contains a hidden influence that will cause individuals to perform the most insane acts. The techniques of Dianetics were developed by L. Ron Hubbard in the early part of the last century and presented to the world in the bestselling self-help book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

While Dianetics is over sixty-five years old, this Dianetics seminar is new. It is based on the book and a video series, How to Use Dianetics, consisting of 18 short films which illustrate specific Dianetics principles and techniques. With these films, people new to the subject can easily learn what to expect from a Dianetics session and how to help another using this technology. “The seminar not only helps people become aware of the cause of their problems, but also the ability to handle it,” says the seminar director.

Following the presentation of the first of these films, those attending the seminar immediately put the materials to use, working with other attendees to apply the techniques right there on the spot.  Supervised by trained Dianetics specialists, the seminar participants gain first-hand experience with just how easy it is to resolve the difficulties and pain that life leaves in its wake. Church pastor Rev. Brian Fesler says, “Many people have finished this seminar, and I want everyone to experience the benefits of Dianetics.  It’s not just for members of my church—anyone can have it.”


The two-day Dianetics seminar is offered every weekend at the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville at 1130 8th Avenue South. For more information, visit www.dianetics.org or call the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation at 615-687-4600.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Tennessee Human Rights Day Planning Begins for 2017

Human rights are a hot topic.

Whether you’re reading about fair housing, racial disparities or gender equality, these are all human rights issues. To bring increased awareness and education on human rights to the public, a celebration for Human Rights Day takes place each December in Nashville, Tenn.

On this day, Tennesseans gather to celebrate the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations, originally signed on Dec 10, 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“Human Rights Day means acknowledging leaders while encouraging others to take up the torch for the future,” says planning committee chair Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology. The celebration has been tentatively set for December 7, 2017.

The celebration centers around the Human Rights Lifetime Achievement awards, the Rising Advocate Awards, and the Outstanding Service Award.  Last year, Rising Advocate Awards were given to three individuals who have made great strides for human rights and show even greater promise for the future. They were Anna Carella, who has worked both locally and in other parts of the world to help others in need and most recently with Advocates for Women's and Kids' Equality (AWAKE); Justin Jones, a Fisk University senior who has already proven himself as a strong advocate for social justice and peace by organizing several events, marches and protests with the purpose to help others; and Mohamed Shukri-Hassan, who works with the Tennessee Immigrants and Refugee Rights Coalition and American Center for Outreach and was on the first Mayor’s New Americans Advisory Council.

The award winners in the category of Outstanding Service were Juan Canedo for his work on issues that affect the wellbeing of the Hispanic community and the community at large, with particular emphasis on empowering Hispanic immigrants; and Derri Smith, who is the Founder and Executive Director of End Slavery Tennessee.  

The Lifetime Achievement award last year went to Dr. Charles Kimbrough, a longtime civil rights activist who established and organized NAACP chapters in four different cities across the South and served as President of the Nashville Branch, where he saw a surge in chapter membership, addressing civil rights issues within the local African American community.

The committee plans to feature many different human rights organizations during this year’s celebration, especially government agencies and non-profit organizations in Tennessee that have commitments to some part of the thirty rights as laid out in the UDHR. Organizations who wish to participate in the planning may contact the organizer through www.nashvillehumanrights.org.


Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Nashville Scientologists Planning Drug-Free Events in Honor of Red Ribbon Week

Tennessee has a drug problem: heroin. During 2016, prescription opioid abuse was at the top of the charts, and while it continues be a problem statewide, officials have taken steps to curb the problem. While it has been slowly on the decline, according to state officials, there has been an unintended consequence. With prescription pain pills becoming harder to attain, addicts have turned to another type of opioid in heroin. According to the latest numbers from the Department of Mental Health, in 2013, the number of patients seeking treatment from state facilities for heroin abuse was 454. By 2015, that number had jumped to 839.

To protect youth from the disastrous effects of abusing this and other drugs, Scientologists and others are teaming up with Drug-Free Tennessee to bring the truth about drugs to students during Red Ribbon Week.

Red Ribbon Week is a week-long celebration at the end of October to promote a drug-free lifestyle. The Red Ribbon has been worn as a symbol since 1985 when DEA Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was murdered. Angered parents and youth in communities across the country began wearing Red Ribbons to show their commitment to raise awareness of the killing and destruction caused by drugs in America.

Volunteers will join with Drug-Free Tennessee for educational events and to distribute copies of The Truth About Drugs, a booklet that helps young people understand what drugs are and how they affect the user.

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, an international non-profit organization. Its materials demonstrate the dangers of drugs through factual information and interviews with former addicts giving personal perspectives on each of the substances covered.

For more information on the Truth About Drugs, visit drugfreeworld.org. For more information on the Church of Scientology and its programs, visit Scientology.org.