Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Says ‘Green It Up’

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is inviting friends and neighbors to a community cleanup for World Environment Day in June.


Leaders for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have announced a neighborhood cleanup event for World Environment Day. The cleanup has been dubbed “Green It Up,” as part of an ongoing campaign by the organization to make the city of Nashville greener with less litter.

In 2016, TWTH-TN invited environmental activists and leaders to a roundtable discussion in observance of World Environment Day under the heading “It’s Your City – Green It Up.” This year, organizers are taking this message to the streets.

The “Green It Up” cleanup will take place on June 3rd at 10am. Volunteers will meet in the community hall of the Church of Scientology for cleanup supplies and refreshments.

The Way to Happiness Association wants the Green It Up campaign to bring people together who care about the environment so they can connect and can do bigger things. TWTH was formed around the book The Way To Happiness, written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard, which has twenty-one precepts based on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others. One of these precepts is “Safeguard and Improve the Environment,” which takes to heart the care for the planet.

World Environment Day occurs each year on June 5th and is celebrated by the United Nations. According to unep.org, World Environment Day “…has grown to be a broad, global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated by stakeholders in over 100 countries. It also serves as the ‘people’s day’ for doing something positive for the environment, galvanizing individual actions into a collective power that generates an exponential positive impact on the planet.”

For more information on “Green It Up,” or if you would like to participate, send an email to twthnashville@gmail.com.


Drug-Free Tennessee Plans All-Out Effort for International Day Against Drug Abuse

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, and is planning a series of large-scale events for the 2017 International Day Against Drug Abuse.

In just the past week, news about drug abuse is rampant across Tennessee: a Tullahoma High School band co-director was arrested for the manufacture and sale of drugs, a Tennessee man was arrested for selling kratom, a Hendersonville nurse was arrested and accused of selling Xanax bars, and in Grainger County, 30 people were indicted in a drug roundup.

“When it comes to people’s lives being ruined by drugs and addiction, the news is just non-stop,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” he says.

For this very reason, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) has been working to organize a series of events in honor of International Day Against Drug Abuse, which takes place each year on June 26. “We have about 5 events planned so far,” says Fesler, but his group has high goals to educate people and intends to meet them.

International Day Against Drug Abuse was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1987. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime is leading a global campaign to raise awareness about the major challenge that illicit drugs represent to society as a whole, and especially to the young. The goal of the campaign is to mobilize support and inspire people to act against drug use, according to unodc.org.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org. 

Friday, May 12, 2017

Tennessee Scientologist Stands Up for Patients’ Rights

Scientologists are standing up for the rights of those who aren’t able to stand up for themselves.

In Tennessee, Scientologists are outspoken about helping those being abused in the mental health field. They work with the Nashville chapter of Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR Nashville) to help victims of psychiatric abuse document their cases and file complaints.

On the CCHRNashville.org website, the question is posed: “Victim of Brain Stimulation?” followed by the text, “Do you know someone who has been damaged by experimental psychiatric treatments including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS) or any other electric shock or magnetic wave to the brain? Report abuse.”

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out and finding more and more people coming forward with stories of abuse. They are working hard every day to help those who have been hurt at the hands of psychiatrists.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. It was founded in 1969 by the Church of Scientology with the mission to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. Fesler says, “CCHR has supporters from many faiths.  Human rights abuse doesn’t discriminate and neither do we.”


CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Nashville Hubbard Dianetics Foundation Celebrates 67th Anniversary

The Adventure of Dianetics began 67 years ago.

For anyone who has experienced self-doubt, depression, anxiety or unreasonable fears, the book Dianetics: the Modern Science of Mental Health is the resource to turn to for answers and guidance. This book was authored and published in 1950, launching a movement for Man to know and help himself.

L. Ron Hubbard began the book with these words, “Dianetics is an adventure. It is an exploration into Terra Incognita, the human mind, that vast and hitherto unknown realm half an inch back of our foreheads.” He further invited readers to “Treat it as an adventure. And may you never be the same again.” Millions have done just that.

To commemorate this anniversary, the Nashville Church of Scientology is holding a Dianetics anniversary celebration this week to share news of the application of Dianetics technology across the South. Awards will be given to those who have done the most to spread the message contained within, those who have counseled others using the materials, and to groups who have helped great numbers of people.

Now available in over 100 nations and 50 languages, more than 22 million copies of Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health have been sold and it has appeared on at least 116 bestseller lists. Dianetics sparked the movement that ultimately led to the founding of the Scientology religion, the only major religion to emerge in the 20th century. L. Ron Hubbard went on to document his research into the spirit, mind and life in 18 Basic books, thousands of other written materials and nearly 2,500 recorded lectures—the Scripture of Scientology.

Today, L. Ron Hubbard's works are studied and applied daily in over a thousand Dianetics centers, Scientology churches, missions and organizations around the world. The Dianetics Seminar has seen much success in Nashville where it is delivered out of the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, a department within the Church of Scientology.

For more information on Dianetics, visit the Dianetics website at www.Dianetics.org. For an interactive audiovisual overview of the life and works of L. Ron Hubbard, visit www.LRonHubbard.org.


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Tennessee United for Human Rights Offers Speakers for Summer Workshops

Tennessee United for Human Rights, which works under the umbrella of the international organization United for Human Rights, is offering speakers for summer workshops.


Human rights education should never take a summer vacation, according to volunteers with Tennessee United for Human Rights (TNUHR). “Human rights are vital in education and children today need to know what their rights are, so they can educate others, defend their rights and help create a better society,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, the regional coordinator for Tennessee United for Human Rights.

Rev. Fesler recently gave a workshop on Human Rights 101 during the Tennessee Conference on Volunteerism. The workshop was aimed at volunteers, to help them first learn their basic human rights, then enlighten them on how to help others understand their rights, too.

TNUHR leaders have given workshops over summer in past years for organizations such as the Urban League of Middle Tennessee, and are offering similar summer workshops for 2017.

The purpose of TNUHR is to teach people about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. United for Human Rights is a global movement, including hundreds of groups, clubs and chapters around the world.

“Why do we teach people these basic human rights? Because everyone deserves to know,” says Rev. Fesler.


For more information about Tennessee United for Human Rights or Youth for Human Rights, visit tnuhr.org. 

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Can Help Document Abuse

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work to spread information on dangerous practices in the field of mental health and help those who have been abused.

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) has been working to help victims of psychiatric abuse by documenting cases. On the CCHRNashville.org website, the question is posed: “Victim of Brain Stimulation?” followed by the text, “Do you know someone who has been damaged by experimental psychiatric treatments including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS) or any other electric shock or magnetic wave to the brain? Report abuse.”

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out and finding more and more people coming forward with stories of abuse. We are working every day to help those who have been hurt at the hands of psychiatrists.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS).


CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.