Thursday, November 16, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Presents an Introduction to Human Rights

Part of an international movement spanning 192 countries, the Church of  Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville is raising awareness of human rights in commemoration of the 69th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The Nashville Church of Scientology is set to have a special event to introduce young advocates to the subject of human rights for International Human Rights Day this year.

Children, along with others new to the subject, will see interactive visual displays on each of the human rights, will read easy-to-assimilate materials, and will get the chance to put human rights into action with activities that will give them a practical view of specific rights.

Last year, the church worked with Tennessee United for Human Rights to produce a video of children each saying an abbreviated version of one of the human rights. This video was then shown during the Tennessee Celebration of International Human Rights Day, and is now online at tnuhr.org.

“It’s so important for people to learn at a young age what their human rights are,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology. “We live in a world where rights are being taken away by those seeking to oppress and this is made easier by the fact that people just don’t know what their rights are. Education is vital in this battle against ignorance and oppression.”

Human Rights day commemorates the United Nations adoption in 1948 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights--the world's premier human rights document. Despite the best intentions of those who crafted the Declaration, 68 years later, the UN points out, "disrespect for basic human rights continues to be widespread in all parts of the globe. Extremist movements subject people to horrific violence. Messages of intolerance and hatred prey on our fears. Humane values are under attack."

Human rights are an integral part of the Scientology religion. The Creed of the Church of Scientology, written in 1954 by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard, begins: "We of the Church believe: That all men of whatever race, color or creed were created with equal rights." And the Code of a Scientologist calls on all Scientologists "to support true humanitarian endeavors in the fields of human rights."


The Church of Scientology and Scientologists support United for Human Rights, the world's largest nongovernmental human rights education campaign, active in 192 countries and partnering with 1,500 groups and organizations.  The initiative is inspired by Mr. Hubbard's conviction that "It is vital that all thinking men urge upon their governments sweeping reforms in the field of human rights."

Tennessee Human Rights Day Celebration Centers on Tomorrow’s Leaders

The Tennessee Celebration of International Human Rights Day will take place in Nashville at the First Amendment Center on December 7th, 5pm – 7pm.

The Tennessee Celebration of International Human Rights Day will take place in Nashville at the First Amendment Center on December 7th, from 5pm – 7pm.  The theme for 2017 is “Human Rights: Our Leaders of Tomorrow,” and the planning committee is bringing together a youth panel to discuss freedom of expression.

Human Rights Day is a time to acknowledge leaders who have given their lives to service, as well as those who have done outstanding work and those taking up the torch for tomorrow. Awards go to human rights champions in three categories: Rising Advocate, Outstanding Service and Lifetime Achievement. Past recipients of these prestigious honors can be seen at NashvilleHumanRights.org.

This year, Rising Advocate Awards will be given to three individuals who have made great strides for human rights and show even greater promise for the future. They are Kayo Beshir, an undergraduate student at Middle Tennessee State University who has worked on and off campus to promote human rights; Pratik Dash, who has worked both with Women On Maintaining Education and Nutrition (WOMEN) and the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition (TIRRC); and Madison White, a junior at Lipscomb University who has been actively involved in local pro bono legal clinics, and also volunteers her time with nonprofits such as Make a Wish Foundation, Second Harvest Food Bank and Free for Life International.

The award winners in the category of Outstanding Service are Jerry Redman, Co-Founder and CEO of Second Life Chattanooga which is an awareness and advocacy organization working to end human sex trafficking and Zulfat Suara, a strong advocate for minorities who is currently President Elect of the Tennessee Women Political Caucus and past chair of the American Muslim Advisory Council (AMAC).

The Lifetime Achievement award will be presented to Thelma Harper, the first African-American woman State Senator of Tennessee who has a long history of service and Joey King, a Board Member for Veterans for Peace who has been active in several organizations to promote human rights, diversity and peace.

International Human Rights Day occurs every year to commemorate the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations on Dec 10, 1948. A committee of human rights organizations and nonprofits, including the Tennessee Human Rights Commission, Metro Human Relations Commission, United Nations Association, UNICEF, Amnesty International, Free for Life International, Tennessee United for Human Rights, the Church of Scientology, and others, work together each year to plan the event. The event is ticketed at $10, with proceeds going to fund students attending Model UN. For more information or to reserve a seat, visit NashvilleHumanRights.org.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Scientology Nashville Red Ribbon Week Focuses on Opioid Crisis

More than 1,600 Tennesseans died in 2016 of drug overdose from opiates, illicit drugs and other medications such as benzodiazepines—a 12 percent increase over the year before.

Although state officials have taken steps to successfully curb opiate prescriptions, there has been an unintended consequence: As prescription pain pills become harder to access, addicts have turned to heroin.

To protect youth from the disastrous effects of abusing drugs, Scientologists partnered with Drug-Free Tennessee to bring the truth about drugs to local students. The Nashville Church of Scientology held a Red Ribbon Week program in its Public Information Center to reach local youth with their drug-free message and educational materials.

Red Ribbon Week is held the last week of October nationally to promote drug-free lifestyles. The Red Ribbon was adopted as a symbol in 1985 when undercover DEA Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was murdered by a Mexican drug cartel. His death has inspired parents and youth in communities across the country to take action. Their red ribbons signify their commitment to raising awareness of the death and destruction caused by drugs.

“It’s more important than ever to get the truth about drugs to Tennessee youth,” says Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee. “We want students to think of drugs as a bad deal.”

The Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW) is a secular nonprofit corporation that empowers youth and adults with factual information about drugs so they can make informed decisions to live drug-free.
The Church of Scientology and its members support the Foundation for a Drug-Free World whose Truth About Drugs campaign is one of the world’s largest nongovernmental drug education and prevention initiatives. Thanks to this support, the Foundation provides—free of charge—drug education booklets, videos and educator guides to teachers, mentors and civic and community leaders.


According to the United Nations Office on Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, “Every dollar spent on prevention can save governments up to ten dollars in later costs.” For more information visit scientology.org.

Religious Freedom "Listening Session" at the Church of Scientology

The mission of Tennessee United for Human Rights is to bring about human rights reform by raising awareness of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. To further this purpose, the group organized an International Religious Freedom Day “listening session” Oct 27 to call attention to this vitally important right.

Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology and regional coordinator of
Tennessee United for Human Rights (TnUHR) said, “Religious freedom is so fundamental, so basic, so natural—it is impossible to imagine a world at peace without this essential human right.”

TnUHR plans to publish a State of Religious Freedom Report for Tennessee in 2018, which will include the information gathered through this focus group.

Several faith leaders representing Muslim, Sikh and Christian denominations contributed their views during this public listening session. They were posed and answered questions about their faiths, public perception of their religions, and religious discrimination.

TnUHR is a chapter of United for Human Rights, an international organization formed on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. United for Human Rights provides human rights resources and educational materials to all sectors of society. For more information visit tnuhr.org.


Thursday, October 26, 2017

Scientology Volunteer Minister Shares Experience Helping Texas after Tragedy

Scientology Volunteer Minister, Jennifer, recently returned home to Nashville after helping the disaster relief efforts in Texas.

“A Volunteer Minister is a person who helps his fellow man on a volunteer basis by restoring purpose, truth and spiritual values to the lives of others,” wrote Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard. One such Volunteer Minister, Jennifer, recently recounted her experience helping the disaster relief efforts in Texas from Hurricane Harvey.

“I lived between Austin and San Antonio for 25 years.  When Hurricane Harvey happened I made the decision to go and help right away,” she says.

Jennifer was working with a group of Scientology Volunteer Ministers out of Austin at first, then Houston once roads were clear. Jennifer described her experience on the ground, “We first worked out of a community center, giving out supplies to those with flooded homes. Next, we went out to the houses that had flooded and were now a mess, where mold was growing quickly. Furniture had to be moved out of homes right away. Sheet rock had to be cut out ASAP.  Many elderly folks needed help moving refrigerators, washers and dryers out onto their lawns.”

She also said that she was giving assists on a daily basis to those affected by the hurricane. Assists are techniques developed by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard that help speed healing by addressing the spiritual and emotional factors in stress and trauma.

Jennifer said, “The experience taught me that every little bit helps. Any help is appreciated and everyone can find some way to help. I considered it an honor to be there giving my time and helping to ease another’s load in their time of need... It was a great experience for me and I would do it again in a heartbeat.”

The Church of Scientology’s Volunteer Minister program is a religious social service created in the mid 1970s by L. Ron Hubbard. To make this technology broadly available, the Church provides free online training at the Volunteer Ministers website www.volunteerministers.org. Anyone of any culture or creed may train as a Volunteer Minister and use these tools to help their families and communities.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Tennessee Human Rights Day Planning Committee Calls for Student Participation

The Tennessee Celebration of International Human Rights Day will take place on December 7, 2017 at the John Seigenthaler Center.

For the past decade, Tennessee has held events each year to observe International Human Rights Day, and since 2011, the event has asked for student participation in the form of art. This has included visual art, computer graphics and spoken word presentations. This year, the committee wants students to come together for a theatrical piece to demonstrate freedom of expression.

According to a new page up at nashvillehumanrights.org, “Student actors and performers are being called to participate in the Tennessee Celebration of Human Rights Day by creating a short theatrical presentation to make the audience think.” From there, students are able to submit their name and information for consideration to participate in this way.

“This is a great way to include college age students in human rights day,” says planning committee chair, Rev. Brian Fesler who pastors the Church of Scientology. “We are still asking middle and high school level students to submit visual artistic presentations,” he says, “but wanted to expand student participation this year.”

The Tennessee Celebration of Human Rights Day brings attention and awareness to key topics, and uplifts human rights leaders who deserve recognition for their accomplishments.

Human Rights Day celebrates the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations, originally signed on Dec 10, 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“It’s our intention to foster hope for new generations while celebrating the strides we’ve made,” says Rev. Fesler. The celebration is set for December 7, 2017.

For more information on the event or to participate, visit www.nashvillehumanrights.org.


Drug-Free Tennessee Helping Kids Understand the Truth

Drug-Free Tennessee, the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, has been helping students across the state to learn the harmful effects of drugs before they are lured into taking them.

With drug-related crimes being a weekly occurrence, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) is working out ways to combat usage rates by spreading truth. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” says Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee.

Volunteers have been out in the community, handing out information and giving talks to students in schools. “It works with anyone of any race or creed, as drugs don’t discriminate,” according to Fesler.

Recently, the group visited schools in Davidson and Rutherford Counties where they delivered talks to students, showed educational videos and gave out the Truth About Drugs booklets.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), an international organization based in Los Angeles, and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. At the heart of the campaign are the Truth About Drugs booklets, 13 fact-filled booklets that, without scare tactics, inform about drugs, empowering young people to make their own decisions to live drug-free.


Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs—drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why it is important for all of us to work together to end this epidemic.” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org. 

5 Tips to Overcome Attention Issues at Mental Health Day 'Lunch and Learn'

Mental health watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights educated parents on how to help children with attention issues. The presentation was a "lunch and learn" seminar at the Nashville Church of Scientology.

The Nashville chapter of the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) held a "lunch and learn" to educate parents on how to help their children overcome "attention deficit" issues without harmful drugs. The seminar was held Oct. 10 in honor of World Mental Health Day.

Dr. David Morris of Magnolia Medical Center gave a presentation titled How to Help Children with Attention Issues. It covered five simple ways a parent can help their child overcome attention issues and achieve better mental health in general:

1) Making sure the child has good nutrition
2) Correcting any vitamin or nutrient deficiencies
3) Discovering and eliminating any food from their diets that they may be sensitive to
4) Seeing that they get proper exercise
5) Getting the help they need to study properly, so their attention isn’t so easily hijacked by other things when they are sitting in class

"I'm not telling you it will be easy to change their diet or make sure they don’t play video games all day, but it’s worth it to help them achieve a better state of mental health," said Dr. Morris. He pointed out that the psychotropic drugs prescribed to children for attention difficulties have very dangerous side effects, so whatever parents can do to get these five points in with their children is very well worth the effort.

"We are proud to host this program to educate our community on these simple actions parents can take to help their children," said Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Scientology Church. "We want to thank Dr. Morris for sharing this vital information." He also invited those attending to learn the truth about psychotropic drugs by touring the Citizens Commission on Human Rights displays in the Church’s Public Information Center.

Citizens Commission on Human Rights is a nonprofit mental health watchdog, responsible for helping to enact more than 180 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive practices. CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including but not limited to full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.


CCHR was co-founded in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and professor of psychiatry Dr. Thomas Szasz.

Alerted to the brutality of psychiatric treatment by author and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard who wrote extensively about the abuses of psychiatric patients, CCHR today stands as a powerful voice of reason for those abused and continues its advocacy for reforms. For more information visit the CCHR website.
For more information, visit the Scientology Newsroom.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Tennessee Human Rights Day to Be Held on December 7th at First Amendment Center

The Tennessee celebration of International Human Rights Day will take place on December 7th this year at the John Seigenthaler Center.

For the past decade, Tennessee has held events each year to observe International Human Rights Day, and since 2014, the event has been held at the First Amendment Center, inside the John Seigenthaler Center in Nashville, Tenn.

Whether you’re reading about fair housing, racial disparities or gender equality, these are all human rights issues. The Tennessee Celebration of Human Rights Day brings attention and awareness to key topics, and uplifts human rights leaders who deserve recognition for their accomplishments.

Human Rights Day celebrates the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations, originally signed on Dec 10, 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“It’s our intention to foster hope for new generations while celebrating the strides we’ve made,” says planning committee chair Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology. The celebration is set for December 7, 2017.

The celebration centers around the Human Rights Lifetime Achievement awards, the Rising Advocate Awards, and the Outstanding Service Award.  


The committee plans to feature many different human rights organizations during this year’s celebration, especially government agencies and non-profit organizations in Tennessee that have commitments to some part of the thirty rights as laid out in the UDHR. Organizations who wish to participate in the planning may contact the organizer through www.nashvillehumanrights.org. 

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Educates Parents of Children with Attention Issues

Mental health watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights will be holding a lunch and learn to help educate parents of children with attention issues during World Mental Health Day in October.


The Nashville Chapter of the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) has just announced that it will be holding a lunch and learn to help educate parents on how to handle children with attention issues in observance of World Mental Health Day in October.

Last year, CCHR held a similar workshop to help parents learn how to raise healthy children. Working with Dr. Elizabeth “Liz” Pendergrass of Rock Springs Family Chiropractic who is also a Maximized Living professional, the organization was able to bring awareness to several parents on children’s mental and physical health needs.

CCHR is determined to help educate people, especially parents, on their rights. “It’s important to us that parents know the dangers of psychiatric drugs, as well as the other options available to them so that their children lead happy and healthy lives,” says Meg Epstein, Executive Director of the Nashville CCHR Chapter.

Dr. Pendergrass laid out what to do if a child is experiencing a variety of health issues, and what parents can do to help their children be at a more optimum health level. She discussed societal norms where people are given a pill, and how that merely masks the problem without fixing it. Then she gave the five steps to maximize health, and how to really help children lead healthy lives.

For this year’s workshop, titled “How to Help Children with Attention Issues: 5 Things You Need to Know,” parents will be oriented to five key facts they need in helping their children to be more able to focus. The workshop will be delivered in part by a representative of CCHR and Dr. David Morris of Magnolia Medical Center. Those interested in attending can find more information and register at cchr2017.eventbrite.com.

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health industry watchdog whose mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health.  It works to ensure patient and consumer protections are enacted and upheld as there is rampant abuse in the field of mental health.  In this role, CCHR has helped to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive mental health practices since it was formed five decades ago. For more information on CCHR, visit cchrnashville.org.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Distributes Booklet to Neighbors and Children

Crime and immorality can only be stopped with peace and common sense. And with the need rising ever higher, The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is eager to make this change.

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the international movement which is spreading throughout Nashville, TN.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events. Just this past weekend, the group was in the community at a back-to-school fair distributing dozens of copies of the booklet.

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.”

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. It is the local chapter of The Way to Happiness Foundation, which is based in Los Angeles and acts as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, according to thewaytohappiness.org.

The Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.

To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org.


Tennessee United for Human Rights Says Freedom of Religion is Key to Peace

Tennessee United for Human Rights has a mission to bring human rights education to everyone. And what better way to do this than through discussing these rights at public events? The group has held an event for International Day of Peace for the past two years and will be holding an event again this year on September 21.

International Day of Peace was declared by the United Nations General Assembly as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples. This is more relevant than ever, and TNUHR is planning an event under the heading “Religious Freedom and What this Means Today.”

This is the third annual observance of Peace Day by TNUHR. In 2015, the group organized an eye-opening panel discussion on “Exposing the Hidden World of Human Trafficking,” and in 2016, TNUHR held an event under the theme “Know Your Rights and Survive: Overcoming Domestic Violence.” Expert panelists spoke about human rights abuses, how to recognize signs of violence and trafficking and how to help someone who may be a victim.

This year, the Peace Day event will be held on September 21st at 7pm in the Nashville Church of Scientology community hall.

Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator of the Tennessee United for Human Rights program says, “We want to inspire peace and educate people about their basic rights. With this knowledge, we can work together to end violence in this country.”


TNUHR is a chapter of the international organization United for Human Rights, formed on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to provide human rights resources and educational materials to all sectors of society. For more information about the events on Peace Day or to find out more about Tennessee United for Human Rights, visit tnuhr.org. 

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Nashville Mental Health Exhibition Exposes Dangers of Psychiatric ‘Treatments’

The public must be informed of the effects of mental health drugs, say experts speaking at the exhibition’s opening.

An exhibition exposing the hidden agendas and dangers of the psychiatric industry opened in North Nashville this week. Called “Psychiatry: An Industry of Death,” the exhibition, organized by the psychiatric watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), raises public awareness and exposes the lack of transparency in the field of mental health, where so often only selective data is made available to patients.

At the opening of the exhibition, the theme was “breaking the chains of oppression” and speakers spoke of the need for informed consent in relation to mental treatment. Display panels in the exhibition pointed to information that many in the psychiatric industry choose to ignore, such as the aggression, violence and suicidal thoughts that so often result from prescribed drugs such as antidepressants.

The first speaker, Dr. David Morris, a chiropractor and owner of Magnolia Medical Center, spoke to the extensive drugging and abuse of children in the psychiatric industry and encouraged all attendees to consult a licensed medical professional any time they receive a “diagnosis” from a psychiatrist.

Keynote speaker at the opening, Bishop Marcus Campbell, pastor of Mount Carmel Baptist Church, admonished everyone to look for themselves and said, “We all perish for lack of knowledge,” before urging attendees to tour the exhibit.

The issue of informed consent was highlighted in relation to children and adolescents. Part of the exhibition focused on needless young deaths that could have been avoided if parents had been fully informed about the effects of psychiatric drugs. A majority of so-called “schoolyard shootings” resulting in hundreds of fatalities were shown to have been connected to mind-altering prescription drugs.

Kalee Madorin, spokesperson for the Nashville CCHR Chapter, reinforced the words of the speakers, “Psychiatrists constantly show off their failures in order to get more government funding. They aren’t looking for—and don’t want to find—a cure for mental illness because the money they are making is now in the trillions.”

CCHR is an international psychiatric watchdog group co-founded in 1969 by members of the Church of Scientology and the late professor of psychiatry, Dr. Thomas Szasz. For more information, visit cchrnashville.org.

Monday, September 4, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Changing Lives

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the international movement which is spreading throughout Nashville, TN.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events.

"This book is based on common sense principles and acts as a moral compass,” says Judy Young, Director of The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee, “when people read it, they are able to easily put the concepts in it into practice to live a better life.”

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.”

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. It is the local chapter of The Way to Happiness Foundation, which is based in Los Angeles and acts as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, according to thewaytohappiness.org.

The Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.

To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org.

Hubbard Dianetics Seminar Taps Into Man’s Full Potential

The Hubbard Dianetics Foundation offers a weekly seminar to help people resolve problems, discover the source of unreasonable fears and insecurities, and overcome barriers in life.

What is a person’s true potential, and how could they possibly achieve it? This question has been answered time and again through Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

Since 1985, people from Nashville and Middle Tennessee have found answers about the mind and have been trained in highly effective techniques to resolve unwanted conditions in their lives, thereby unlocking their full potential. It’s all happened at the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, a department within the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville.

Dianetics is defined as “what the soul is doing to the body through the mind,” and the subject explains how the mind contains a hidden influence that will cause individuals to perform the most insane acts. The techniques of Dianetics were developed by L. Ron Hubbard in the early part of the last century and presented to the world in the bestselling self-help book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

While Dianetics is over sixty-five years old, this Dianetics seminar is new. It is based on the book and a video series, How to Use Dianetics, consisting of 18 short films which illustrate specific Dianetics principles and techniques. With these films, people new to the subject can easily learn what to expect from a Dianetics session and how to help another using this technology. “The seminar not only helps people become aware of the cause of their problems, but also the ability to handle it,” says the seminar director.

Following the presentation of the first of these films, those attending the seminar immediately put the materials to use, working with other attendees to apply the techniques right there on the spot.  Supervised by trained Dianetics specialists, the seminar participants gain first-hand experience with just how easy it is to resolve the difficulties and pain that life leaves in its wake. Church pastor Rev. Brian Fesler says, “Many people have finished this seminar, and I want everyone to experience the benefits of Dianetics.  It’s not just for members of my church—anyone can have it.”


The two-day Dianetics seminar is offered every weekend at the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville at 1130 8th Avenue South. For more information, visit www.dianetics.org or call the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation at 615-687-4600.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Tennessee Human Rights Day Planning Begins for 2017

Human rights are a hot topic.

Whether you’re reading about fair housing, racial disparities or gender equality, these are all human rights issues. To bring increased awareness and education on human rights to the public, a celebration for Human Rights Day takes place each December in Nashville, Tenn.

On this day, Tennesseans gather to celebrate the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations, originally signed on Dec 10, 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“Human Rights Day means acknowledging leaders while encouraging others to take up the torch for the future,” says planning committee chair Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology. The celebration has been tentatively set for December 7, 2017.

The celebration centers around the Human Rights Lifetime Achievement awards, the Rising Advocate Awards, and the Outstanding Service Award.  Last year, Rising Advocate Awards were given to three individuals who have made great strides for human rights and show even greater promise for the future. They were Anna Carella, who has worked both locally and in other parts of the world to help others in need and most recently with Advocates for Women's and Kids' Equality (AWAKE); Justin Jones, a Fisk University senior who has already proven himself as a strong advocate for social justice and peace by organizing several events, marches and protests with the purpose to help others; and Mohamed Shukri-Hassan, who works with the Tennessee Immigrants and Refugee Rights Coalition and American Center for Outreach and was on the first Mayor’s New Americans Advisory Council.

The award winners in the category of Outstanding Service were Juan Canedo for his work on issues that affect the wellbeing of the Hispanic community and the community at large, with particular emphasis on empowering Hispanic immigrants; and Derri Smith, who is the Founder and Executive Director of End Slavery Tennessee.  

The Lifetime Achievement award last year went to Dr. Charles Kimbrough, a longtime civil rights activist who established and organized NAACP chapters in four different cities across the South and served as President of the Nashville Branch, where he saw a surge in chapter membership, addressing civil rights issues within the local African American community.

The committee plans to feature many different human rights organizations during this year’s celebration, especially government agencies and non-profit organizations in Tennessee that have commitments to some part of the thirty rights as laid out in the UDHR. Organizations who wish to participate in the planning may contact the organizer through www.nashvillehumanrights.org.


Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Nashville Scientologists Planning Drug-Free Events in Honor of Red Ribbon Week

Tennessee has a drug problem: heroin. During 2016, prescription opioid abuse was at the top of the charts, and while it continues be a problem statewide, officials have taken steps to curb the problem. While it has been slowly on the decline, according to state officials, there has been an unintended consequence. With prescription pain pills becoming harder to attain, addicts have turned to another type of opioid in heroin. According to the latest numbers from the Department of Mental Health, in 2013, the number of patients seeking treatment from state facilities for heroin abuse was 454. By 2015, that number had jumped to 839.

To protect youth from the disastrous effects of abusing this and other drugs, Scientologists and others are teaming up with Drug-Free Tennessee to bring the truth about drugs to students during Red Ribbon Week.

Red Ribbon Week is a week-long celebration at the end of October to promote a drug-free lifestyle. The Red Ribbon has been worn as a symbol since 1985 when DEA Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was murdered. Angered parents and youth in communities across the country began wearing Red Ribbons to show their commitment to raise awareness of the killing and destruction caused by drugs in America.

Volunteers will join with Drug-Free Tennessee for educational events and to distribute copies of The Truth About Drugs, a booklet that helps young people understand what drugs are and how they affect the user.

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, an international non-profit organization. Its materials demonstrate the dangers of drugs through factual information and interviews with former addicts giving personal perspectives on each of the substances covered.

For more information on the Truth About Drugs, visit drugfreeworld.org. For more information on the Church of Scientology and its programs, visit Scientology.org.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Fosters Hope on World Humanitarian Day

The World Humanitarian Day open house at the Nashville Church of Scientology inspired volunteers to take action and exemplify the spirit of the day.

The Nashville Church of Scientology hosted an open house on World Humanitarian Day to uplift volunteers to take up the mantle and help others in times of need. “Now more than ever it is important for all of us to work together to re-build our broken world,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology, “It will take fortitude and strength of character, but is a necessity nonetheless.”

Joining the Church for the event were local pastors and chaplains who were thrilled to hear about the church’s Volunteer Minister program and offered words of support and encouragement to those taking up the torch. 

The Church of Scientology’s Volunteer Minister program is a religious social service created in the mid 1970s by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard who said, "The Volunteer Minister helps 'on a volunteer basis by restoring purpose, truth and spiritual values to the lives of others.'"

To make this technology broadly available, the Church has a Volunteer Minister tent that is set up at fairs and other community events to offer help freely to anyone. The Church also provides free online training at the Volunteer Ministers website. Anyone of any culture or creed may train as a Volunteer Minister and use these tools to help their families and communities. During the open house, everyone was invited outside to see the tent where they could learn practical skills to help others.


The Volunteer Minister program was expressly intended for use by Scientologists and non- Scientologists alike. Transcending all ethnic, cultural and religious boundaries, the Volunteer Ministers program is there for anyone in need of help. Volunteer Minister training is available free of charge through the Scientology Volunteer Minister website to anyone who wishes to help others, at www.volunteerministers.org.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Reaching Out to Parents

Drug-Free Tennessee provides materials to educate parents and their children about the hazards of drugs.

This past weekend, Drug-Free Tennessee participated in an annual event for parents of school children, where they distributed copies of The Truth About Drugs booklets to parents, teachers and children alike.

“We need to spread a positive drug-free message to parents and their children,” says Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee, “This is vital to halt drug abuse and especially the opioid epidemic that is sweeping this state and country.”

DFT has been out in the community, handing out information and spreading the word. “Education is the best offense,” says Fesler.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), an international organization based in Los Angeles, and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. At the heart of the campaign are the Truth About Drugs booklets, 13 fact-filled booklets that, without scare tactics, inform about drugs, empowering young people to make their own decisions to live drug-free.


Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs—drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why it is important for all of us to work together .” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org. 

Monday, August 14, 2017

Nashville Religion Communicators Council Announces Interfaith Musical Event for 2018

The Nashville Chapter of the Religion Communicators Council (RCC) has just announced that it will be holding an interfaith musical event in early 2018.


The Religion Communicators Council (RCC), founded in 1929, is an interfaith association of religion communicators at work in print and electronic communication, marketing and public relations. Members of the RCC come from many different religions and backgrounds including Christianity, Judaism, Baha’i Faith, Islam and Scientology, among others.

The Nashville Chapter has just announced that it is planning an interfaith musical event for early 2018.  It promises to bring together people of many different faiths for an event of musical and religious harmony.

Rev. Brian Fesler, president of the Nashville chapter and pastor of the Church of Scientology, says, “It has been a professional and personal mission of mine for some time to bring together people of different religious backgrounds for an awe-inspiring musical production. I couldn’t be more excited that we have now set a date and are beginning to bring key players together for this.”

The event will be called “The Spirit of Harmony: An Interfaith Showcase.” Rev. Fesler says the group will be reaching out to any and all religious people to participate, and he hopes to have a very diverse mix.


“We are reaching out as a chapter,” says Rev. Fesler, “this musical production will highlight a wonderful medium of communication which ties into the very fabric of our city.” For more information, visit religioncommunicators.org/nashville-chapter. 

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Participates in Annual Night Out Against Crime

Drug-Free Tennessee participates each year in National Night Out Against Crime by distributing the Truth About Drugs booklets at neighborhood events.


Drug-Free Tennessee is committed to making neighborhoods drug and crime-free. So it was that volunteers joined community partners, neighbors and police for National Night Out Against Crime to help put an end to rampant crime and drug violations.

National Night Out is meant to stop crime before it starts. It was designed to heighten awareness; generate support for, and participation in, local anticrime programs; strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships; and send a message to criminals letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back, according to natw.org.

This year marks the 35th annual event held to combat drug use and prevent crime, and the 9th year that Drug-Free Tennessee has participated in the Nashville festivities. Neighborhoods frequently celebrate with a mix of food, dancing, information booths and crime forums to help promote safer living.

Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee, says, “Youth today are having to make decisions about drugs at a younger age. We need to get them reliable information so they can make educated choices.”

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, which provides booklets with information on how drugs affect the body and mind, what a dealer might say, and common street names to young people know how to avoid them. The materials are available free of charge, and can be obtained through drugfreeworld.org.

For more information on National Night Out, visit natw.org.  For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee or to order materials, visit drugfreetn.org.

Nashville Church of Scientology Brings People Together for Friendship Day

International Day of Friendship was created to inspire peace and bridge building. The Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville just held its third annual event with a diverse crowd.

Terrorism, shootings, war—it’s become commonplace to hear of these things day after day in a stream of news. Yet, there is a group of people determined to bring people together despite differences of race, color and creed. It all happened at the International Day of Friendship in the community hall of the Nashville Church of Scientology.

International Day of Friendship is an annual observance, dignified in 2011 by the United Nations General Assembly with the idea that “friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities,” according to un.org.  The resolution emphasizes that young people, as future leaders, can be brought together in activities with different cultures. This promotes international understanding and respect for diversity.

The Church of Scientology held its third annual dialogue for the day on August 1st, with community leaders and members coming together to participate. Organizers called for participation from the myriad ethnicities and nationalities that make up the diverse city of Nashville, and held an “International Potluck” as part of the event. “The whole point was to bring a diverse group of people together and demonstrate the power of intentional friendship,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology.

“Most of life’s problems come from a basic misunderstanding of each other, a misunderstanding of intentions.  Getting along with one another starts with getting to know one another,” he says.

The Church of Scientology partnered in this effort with The Way To Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN).  TWTH-TN provides a community betterment program based on the book The Way To Happiness by L. Ron Hubbard. The program is predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. Several concepts in the book promote dialogue and friendship. Among them, “Respect the Religious Beliefs of Others,” “Be Worthy of Trust,” and “Try to Treat Others As You Would Want them to Treat You.”

For more information on the Church of Scientology, its programs or upcoming events, visit scientology-ccnashville.org.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Helping Those Who Can’t Help Themselves

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work to spread information on dangerous practices in the field of mental health and help those who have been abused.

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) has been working to help victims of psychiatric abuse by documenting cases. On the CCHRNashville.org website, the question is posed: “Victim of Brain Stimulation?” followed by the text, “Do you know someone who has been damaged by experimental psychiatric treatments including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS) or any other electric shock or magnetic wave to the brain? Report abuse.”

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out and finding more and more people coming forward with stories of abuse. We are working every day to help those who have been hurt at the hands of psychiatrists.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS).


CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Drug-Free Tennessee Spreading the Word for a Healthier Future

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, and has been hitting the streets and parks to spread the word.

With drug-related crimes being a weekly occurrence, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) is working out ways to combat usage rates by spreading truth. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” says Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee.

DFT has been out in the community, handing out information and spreading the word. “It works with anyone of any race or creed, as drugs don’t discriminate,” according to Fesler.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), an international organization based in Los Angeles, and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. At the heart of the campaign are the Truth About Drugs booklets, 13 fact-filled booklets that, without scare tactics, inform about drugs, empowering young people to make their own decisions to live drug-free.


Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs—drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why it is important for all of us to work together to end this epidemic.” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org. 

Thursday, July 20, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Helping Neighbors

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is working to help communities across Nashville.

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the movement which is making its way throughout the city of Nashville, Tenn.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events. Volunteers have distributed booklets to households near downtown Nashville, and are planning even more events in the coming months.

"This book is based on common sense principles and acts as a moral compass,” says Judy Young, Director of The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee, “when people read it, they are able to easily put the concepts in it into practice to live a better life.”

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.” In the three decades since it was authored, 100 million copies of the book passed hand to hand.

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org.




Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Human Rights Day Celebration in Tennessee Set for December 7

The committee planning the Tennessee celebration of International Human Rights Day, which takes place in December, has just announced a tentative date for the event.


Each year, Tennesseans gather to celebrate the ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations on Dec 10, originally signed in 1948. It is always an event with a message of hope for the future, respect for the past, and looking at what it will take to change human rights abuses in the present.

“Human Rights Day means acknowledging leaders while encouraging others to take up the torch for the future,” says planning committee chair Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology. The celebration has been tentatively set for December 7, 2017.

The celebration centers around the Human Rights Lifetime Achievement awards, the Rising Advocate Awards, and the Outstanding Service Award.  Last year, Rising Advocate Awards were given to three individuals who have made great strides for human rights and show even greater promise for the future. They were Anna Carella, who has worked both locally and in other parts of the world to help others in need and most recently with Advocates for Women's and Kids' Equality (AWAKE); Justin Jones, a Fisk University senior who has already proven himself as a strong advocate for social justice and peace by organizing several events, marches and protests with the purpose to help others; and Mohamed Shukri-Hassan, who works with the Tennessee Immigrants and Refugee Rights Coalition and American Center for Outreach and was on the first Mayor’s New Americans Advisory Council.

The award winners in the category of Outstanding Service were Juan Canedo for his work on issues that affect the wellbeing of the Hispanic community and the community at large, with particular emphasis on empowering Hispanic immigrants; and Derri Smith, who is the Founder and Executive Director of End Slavery Tennessee.  

The Lifetime Achievement award last year went to Dr. Charles Kimbrough, a longtime civil rights activist who established and organized NAACP chapters in four different cities across the South and served as President of the Nashville Branch, where he saw a surge in chapter membership, addressing civil rights issues within the local African American community.

The committee plans to feature many different human rights organizations during this year’s celebration, especially the Tennessee governmental and non-profit agencies that have commitments to the thirty rights as laid out in the UDHR. Organizations who wish to participate in the planning may contact the organizer through www.nashvillehumanrights.org.