Thursday, April 13, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Holds ‘Swing Into Health’ Concert

The Nashville Church of Scientology recently held a community concert in observance of World Health Day, called ‘Swing Into Health.’

When a jump-jive swing band comes rolling through Nashville right around World Health Day, it only makes sense that a concert related to healthy living is in order. And that’s exactly what happened during the second week of April when the Jive Aces visited the Church of Scientology for a community concert. Aptly titled “Swing Into Health,” the concert brought people together for a fun evening where they were able to engage with organizations promoting healthy lifestyles such as being drug-free, doing community gardening and finding affordable healthcare.

The Church of Scientology supports the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. The local chapter, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) hosted the concert to observe World Health Day. 

Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology, says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on how to be healthy—this includes staying away from illegal drugs, and there are many other aspects to health that people should know. By educating people in a fun, upbeat way, they could be more inclined to make healthier choices.”

The Jive Aces, who headlined the concert, are a six piece swing band that has been together for over a decade. The group has performed at thousands of festivals, theatres and events throughout the UK, Europe and USA, as well as Japan, Israel, South Africa, Morocco and the Caribbean, 30 countries in all. The Jive Aces are renowned for their high energy Jump Jive music (the exciting sound where Swing meets Rock ‘n Roll) and spectacular stage show.

According to jiveaces.com, “Having become the first ever band to reach the semifinals of Britain's Got Talent in 2012 following up with a performance for Her Majesty The Queen as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations and performances for both the Olympic and Paralympic celebrations, The Jive Aces have truly established themselves as the UK's top Jive & Swing band.”


For more information on the Church of Scientology or its programs, visit scientology-ccnashville.org. 

Drug-Free Tennessee Engaging with Community at Local Health Fair

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, and has been hard at work spreading its message during events with other organizations.

Within the last month, thousands of dollars’ worth of drugs and cash were seized as part of a multi-agency investigation across middle Tennessee where authorities found marijuana, cocaine, guns and cash at several different homes in residential neighborhoods; nearly $13 million in fentanyl (a narcotic) was seized in a drug bust by police in Decaturville; and just yesterday, three people were arrested in a drug bust that uncovered 15 lbs of cocaine and 2 lbs of heroin.

“When it comes to people’s lives being ruined by drugs and addiction, the news is just non-stop,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” he says.

For this very reason, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) has been out in the community educating residents and providing resources.  This past week, volunteers spread the word to neighbors during a community health fair, where they also offered further help in the form of lectures to boys and girls clubs, Sunday school classes and other groups.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject.

Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.”

For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org.


Thursday, April 6, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Opens Its Doors to the Community

The Church of Scientology is preparing to celebrate its 32nd year in Nashville, TN, and with that, is hosting several events for the community at large.  

The Scientology religion came into this world in 1952. As such, members of the Church recognize that as a religion, it is still young when compared to other world religions such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. In a recent interview with pastor of the Nashville Church, Rev. Brian Fesler said he enjoys learning about people of other faiths, how they get along in life, and what drew them to their faith calling. “When you look at all of the diverse people of this world, it is actually very beautiful that each individual person can find a religion that gives them a path, and a calling to be able to benefit spiritually in this very materialistic world,” he said.

Rev. Fesler went on to speak about how people find Scientology, “People are naturally very curious about Scientology. We accept all kinds of people for classes and spiritual counseling. People come and go, sometimes they read a book or try an introductory course and then we’ll hear from them three years later.  Others find quickly that Scientology is the path that makes the most sense to them, and they often become members of the church.  Either way, Scientology is here to stay, and we will be here for them any time.”

The Nashville Church of Scientology will celebrate its 32nd anniversary with a private event at the end of April. But coming this week, the church is opening its doors with a community concert in honor of World Health Day. The concert will take place in the church’s community event hall. Rev. Fesler says he expects around 80 to attend that evening. “Since we opened our doors in the beautiful Fall School building, we’ve welcomed community members to a variety of events, shows and classes. Many thousands of people have come into our building, and learned more about what we do. Some have taken a class or two, and some have just enjoyed the beautiful architecture. What is most meaningful to me is that these people have opened themselves up to learn what Scientology is all about – to see for themselves, not base an opinion on hearsay or what they see in the media.”

“Scientology is an active religion, where one seeks to know life and help people," says Rev. Fesler, "and we thrive on positive results.” To learn more about the Church of Scientology, its programs and courses, visit www.scientology.org.  

Religion Communicators Council Explores the Proliferation of Channels of Communication

How does one contribute to his faith? Some take up the calling to be a minister, imam, rabbi or priest while others might take time to volunteer or give weekly donations. There’s a certain class of people who have taken up a unique calling: communication.

The Religion Communicators Council (RCC) is an interfaith organization more than 80 years old which has members from many faith traditions, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Baha’i, Scientology, Hinduism, Buddhism and more. Members of the RCC make it their job to communicate on behalf of their tradition, to spread the good news and encourage good deeds throughout the world.

Each year, a national convention is held for all RCC members across the United States. It is a time to come together as one, to celebrate excellence in communication, and gain ideas and inspiration.  The 2017 conference took place in April in Chicago, Illinois.  RCC members gathered under the theme "Virtually Here, There and Everywhere: Faith Communications and Presence," alluding to the myriad channels of communication in today’s world, and how to best utilize those channels in engaging an audience or disseminating information.  It was held at Crowne Plaza Hotel and consisted of a long weekend of activities and workshops from Thursday to Saturday.

The convention opened with a plenary by Rev. Myron McCoy, Senior Pastor at First United Methodist Church at the Chicago; Angela Cowser, Associate Professor of the Sociology of Religion, Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary; Rami Nashashibi, Executive Director, Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN); and the Honorable Toni Preckwinckle, the President of the Cook County Board of Commissioners.  They took time to speak to the topic “Guns into Plowshares, Presence into Hope: On Violence and Faith.”

During the first evening of the convention, the annual DeRose Hinkhouse awards were presented to active members of RCC who demonstrate excellence in religious communications and public relations. The most prestigious honor were the Best of Class awards, and among the winners were Christie R. House, General Board of Global Ministries for the United Methodist Church with the New World Outlook Magazine; Anuttama Dasa with ISKCON Communications for The Joy of Devotion; and to Steven D. Martin with the National Council of Churches for the National Council of Churches Podcast.

Religion Communicators heard from experts on social media, media engagement, making podcasts, getting accreditation, seeing theater as communication, creating material specific to young people, building a blog, handling a crisis, and countering hate movements.

The convention concluded Saturday evening with the presentation of the Wilbur Awards, recognizing the work of individuals in secular media who communicate religious issues, values and themes with the utmost professionalism, fairness and honesty. Award winners for this prestigious honor included The Associated Press, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, CBS News, National Geographic, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly, and the Commercial Appeal (Memphis, Tennessee). Hidden Figures, the 20th Century Fox production about the African-American women behind astronaut John Glenn's historic space launch was presented this award as well as Roots, the History Channel's remake of Alex Haley's portrait of American slavery; and black-ish, ABC-TV's comedy about a black family's search for cultural identity. Photos and the full list of winners are available on the Wilbur Awards page of the RCC website.

The Religion Communicators Council (RCC), founded in 1929, is an interfaith association of religion communicators at work in print and electronic communication, marketing and in public relations. Members of the RCC come from many different religions and backgrounds including Christianity, Judaism, Baha’i, Hinduism, Scientology, Buddhist, Sikh and Islam among others.

For more information about the RCC or the annual convention, including a complete list of DeRose Hinkhouse and Wilbur Award winners, visit religioncommunicators.org.



Thursday, March 23, 2017

Inspirational Birthday Celebration Features Past, Present and Future Legacy of L. Ron Hubbard

To celebrate his March 13, 1911 birthday, each year Scientologists from sixty countries gather at the religion’s spiritual nexus in Clearwater, Florida in a weekend celebration of their founder’s life. This gathering and speeches is videoed, then re-shown in churches around the world the following weekend.

In Nashville, the Church members came together with guests and friends to see the many accomplishments and cast their eyes toward a limitless future, inspired by the life and works of L. Ron Hubbard.

LRH, as his multitudinous followers know him, was a polymath—a person of wide-ranging knowledge and education. Beginning as the youngest Eagle Scout in American history (awarded just days after his thirteenth birthday), LRH explored the religious landscape of Asia by the time he was fifteen. Mr. Hubbard went on to become the Guinness Book’s most translated author, and also holds their record for most audio books by one author.

His work toward the salvation of mankind continues to inspire millions worldwide. This annual weekend celebration displays by turns, his research into man as a spiritual being, his technical legacy that allows others to identify, explore and realize their innate spiritual abilities—all this L. Ron Hubbard left to a troubled world.

The evening presented not just a sense of L. Ron Hubbard’s influence on the lives of individuals, but also a surge of real-life stories on how he touched others… if only for just a little while, but ultimately changed the outcome of their destiny.

The night’s spotlight continuously shone on the size and scope of Scientology today, spirited by L. Ron Hubbard’s legacy. His legacy was exquisitely personified in the unveiling of the newest Ideal Organization (Org) in Auckland, New Zealand. The Kiwi congregation formed the second Church of Scientology in the world in 1955. Attendees next witnessed the moving grand opening ceremony with local luminaries heralding the moment as a sea of change for their island nation.

The evening was a celebration of a life well lived—a life lived for the benefit of all mankind, and a life lived to help individuals without hesitation. Birthdays are traditionally a time to acknowledge what a person has done and how they influence the lives of others. But as LRH is transcendent, his birthday celebration ultimately captured what his life and work will continue to mean for the future.

In all, it was a celebration in the name of helping people honor their own potential—of making a world that mankind desires, that he deserves.


Thursday, March 16, 2017

Stress? Anxiety? Depression? The Hubbard Dianetics Seminar Has the Answer

The Hubbard Dianetics Foundation offers a weekly seminar to help people resolve problems, discover the source of unreasonable fears and insecurities, and overcome barriers in life.

How can depression be relieved, or prevented altogether? With Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, everyday people are finding a solution without the use of drugs or medication.

Since 2009, people from Nashville and Middle Tennessee have found answers about the mind and have been trained in highly effective techniques to resolve unwanted conditions in their lives. It’s all happened at the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, a department within the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville.

Dianetics is defined as “what the soul is doing to the body through the mind,” and the subject explains how the mind contains a hidden influence that will cause individuals to perform the most insane acts. The techniques of Dianetics were developed by L. Ron Hubbard in the early part of the last century and presented to the world in the bestselling self-help book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

While Dianetics is over sixty years old, this Dianetics seminar is new. It is based on the book and a video series, How to Use Dianetics, consisting of 18 short films which illustrate specific Dianetics principles and techniques. With these films, people new to the subject can easily learn what to expect from a Dianetics session and how to help another using this technology. “The seminar not only helps people become aware of the cause of their problems, but also the ability to handle it,” says the seminar director.

Following the presentation of the first of these films, those attending the seminar immediately put the materials to use, working with other attendees to apply the techniques right there on the spot.  Supervised by trained Dianetics specialists, the seminar participants gain first-hand experience with just how easy it is to resolve the difficulties and pain that life leaves in its wake. Church pastor Rev. Brian Fesler says, “Many people have finished this seminar, and I want everyone to experience the benefits of Dianetics.  It’s not just for members of my church—anyone can have it.”

The two-day Dianetics seminar is offered every weekend at the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville at 1130 8th Avenue South. For more information, visit www.dianetics.org or call the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation at 615-687-4600.


The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Working for the Future

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the international movement which is spreading throughout Nashville, TN.

"This book is based on common sense principles and acts as a moral compass,” says Judy Young, Director of The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee, “when people read it, they are able to easily put the concepts in it into practice to live a better life.”

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events. Recently, volunteers have distributed more than two hundred booklets to households near downtown Nashville.

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.”

TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. It is the local chapter of The Way to Happiness Foundation, which is based in Los Angeles and acts as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, according to thewaytohappiness.org. The Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.


To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org. 

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Working to Help Parents

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work to spread information to parents on their basic rights so they can help their children.

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter(CCHR Nashville) is working to educate parents on their basic rights as they relate to their children’s mental health and well-being. To do this, volunteers have been to several recent events and informational fairs, to the State Capitol and working with parental groups to get out information in an even broader sphere.

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Rev. Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out, but there is so much work to be done. People are getting hurt every day at the hands of psychiatrists.”


CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Church of Scientology Makes Plans to Celebrate 32nd Anniversary in Nashville

The Nashville Church of Scientology will celebrate its 32nd anniversary with a private event at the end of April. Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church, says, “We’ve been in Nashville for 32 years, and eight in the historic Fall School building. We are celebrating our progress as well as the spirit of Nashville.”

On a global scale, the Church of Scientology has enjoyed greater expansion during the past decade than in the previous 50 years combined. All the while the Church’s ever-growing humanitarian programs in the fields of drug education, human rights, morals education and disaster relief have positively impacted hundreds of millions of lives.

In Nashville, the Church has seen thousands of people entering its doors for the first time over the last eight years. On a humanitarian mission, the Church has participated in numerous human rights awareness events and helped create such events as Human Rights Day and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. march and convocation.  Church members, volunteering in the area of drug education, have delivered more than 230 seminars in Tennessee and have distributed more than 60,000 booklets.

“Scientology is an active religion, where one seeks to know life and help people," says Fesler, "and we have the tools to accomplish that. We don’t ask our members to believe, we want them to act.” To learn more about the Church of Scientology, its programs and courses, visit www.scientology.org. 


Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Invites Nashville to Green It Up

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is inviting friends and neighbors to a community cleanup for World Environment Day in June.

In 2016, The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) invited environmental activists and leaders to a roundtable discussion in observance of World Environment Day under the heading “It’s Your City – Green It Up.” This year, TWTH-TN is taking this message to the streets and organizing a cleanup for the day.

The “Green It Up” cleanup will take place on June 3rd at 10am. Volunteers will meet in the community hall of the Church of Scientology for cleanup supplies, then after the cleanup at 12pm, all volunteers will be treated to lunch at the church where they will be able to learn more about different ways they can improve the environment. TWTH-TN is inviting environmental organizations to have a booth during the lunch hour.

The Way to Happiness Association wants this event to bring people together who care about the environment so they can connect and can do bigger things. TWTH was formed around the book The Way To Happiness, written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard. The Way to Happiness has twenty-one precepts based on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others. One of these precepts is “Safeguard and Improve the Environment,” which takes to heart the care for the planet.

World Environment Day occurs each year on June 5th and is celebrated by the United Nations. According to unep.org, World Environment Day “…has grown to be a broad, global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated by stakeholders in over 100 countries. It also serves as the ‘people’s day’ for doing something positive for the environment, galvanizing individual actions into a collective power that generates an exponential positive impact on the planet.”


For more information on “Green It Up,” or if you would like to participate, send an email to twthnashville@gmail.com. 

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Working with Others to Combat Abuse

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, and has been hard at work spreading its message during events with other organizations.

Within the last month, there have been over 700 drug-related crimes in the Metro Nashville area alone, according to crimemapping.org. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” says Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee.

For this very reason, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) has been out in the community at two events just this past week, handing out information and spreading the word. The first, an event put on by the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services to help encourage congregations and faith-based organizations to encourage recovery from substance abuse; the second, a community gathering at the Midtown Hills Police Precinct to help connect area residents with resources.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject.

Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.”

For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org.


Monday, February 27, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Welcomes Community to Concert for World Health Day

The Church of Scientology supports the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. The Tennessee chapter, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) is planning a concert to observe World Health Day where the organization will have plenty of educational materials to hand for anyone wanting more information on the topic. Organizers say they are also planning to invite community members who have information to share on healthier living.

Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology, says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on how to be healthy—this includes staying away from illegal drugs, but there are many other aspects to health that people should know,” he said.

Rev. Fesler says the concert will be headlined by the Jive Aces, a six piece swing band that has been together for over a decade. The group has performed at thousands of festivals, theatres and events throughout the UK, Europe and USA, as well as Japan, Israel, South Africa, Morrocco and the Caribbean, 30 countries in all. The Jive Aces are renowned for their high energy Jump Jive music (the exciting sound where Swing meets Rock ‘n Roll) and spectacular stage show.

According to jiveaces.com, “Having become the first ever band to reach the semi finals of Britain's Got Talent in 2012 following up with a performance for Her Majesty The Queen as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations and performances for both the Olympic and Paralympic celebrations, The Jive Aces have truly established themselves as the UK's top Jive & Swing band.”

“We’re helping people learn about being healthy in a fun, upbeat way,” says Rev. Fesler.


For more information on the Church of Scientology or its programs, visit scientology-ccnashville.org. 

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Youth for Human Rights Presents Workshop at Tennessee Conference on Volunteerism

The Tennessee chapter of Youth for Human Rights, which works under the umbrella of United for Human Rights, presented a workshop at the Tennessee Conference on Volunteerism.

What do human rights have to do with volunteering? This was the question posed and answered by Rev. Brian Fesler, the regional coordinator for Tennessee United for Human Rights, during a special workshop at the Tennessee Conference on Volunteerism. The workshop, titled Human Rights 101, was aimed at volunteers, to help them first learn their basic human rights, then enlighten them on how to help others understand their rights, too.

As the Volunteer State, the Tennessee government created Volunteer Tennessee under the Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration. According to tn.gov, “The State of Tennessee is the national leader in the promotion of volunteerism, community service initiatives and partnerships in which its citizens of all ages and backgrounds engage in services addressing the educational, public safety, environmental and other human needs of the state and nation.”

The main event each year for Volunteer Tennessee is the Conference on Volunteerism and Service Learning, which aims to “increase service and volunteerism across Tennessee as a means of problem-solving throughout all stages of life.” The conference encourages participants to collaborate to address needs in Tennessee while utilizing service and service-learning as a vehicle for education and change.

Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a nonprofit organization founded in 2001 by Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, an educator born and raised in apartheid South Africa, where she witnessed firsthand the devastating effects of discrimination and the lack of basic human rights.

The purpose of YHRI is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. YHRI has now grown into a global movement, including hundreds of groups, clubs and chapters around the world. One such chapter is in Tennessee, working to educate people across the state on their basic rights.

“Why do we teach people these basic human rights? Because everyone deserves to know,” says Rev. Fesler, “Only when you understand your rights can you defend your rights.”


For more information about Tennessee United for Human Rights or Youth for Human Rights, visit tnuhr.org. 

Thursday, February 16, 2017

CCHR Nashville Lifts up the Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights

The Nashville chapter of Citizens Commission on Human Rights works to expose abuse in the field of mental health.

Volunteers for the Nashville chapter of Citizens Commission on Human Rights are working to raise public awareness of the Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights.

CCHR is a nonprofit mental health watchdog, responsible for helping to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive practices. CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.

CCHR was co-founded in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and Professor of Psychiatry Emeritus Dr. Thomas Szasz at a time when patients were being warehoused in institutions and stripped of all constitutional, civil and human rights.
With recent international headlines warning populations of the dangers of psychotropic drugs, and resultant loss in sales, psychiatrists are shifting focus and regressing to electroshock treatment.  Wrapped in a new package and renamed “deep brain stimulation,” this controversial procedure has been touted as safe without sufficient evidence to back that claim.

CCHR Nashville reminds citizens that the Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights as proffered by CCHR International includes “the right to accept or refuse treatment but in particular, the right to refuse sterilization, electroshock treatment, insulin shock, lobotomy,” and a host of other sordid modes of mental manipulation.  The Declaration contains over thirty rights, such as “the right to discharge oneself at any time and to be discharged without restriction, having committed no offense.”

CCHR Nashville urges citizens to adopt the Mental Health Declaration and give it the force of law in their community and state.  For further information, visit cchr.org.  Read the Declaration at cchr.org/about-us/mental-health-declaration-of-human-rights.html

Nashville Church of Scientology Celebrates Founder L. Ron Hubbard’s 106th Birthday

Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard’s 106th birthday will be celebrated in Nashville by Tennessee area Scientologists on March 18, 2016.

Born March 13, 1911, L. Ron Hubbard had a varied and exciting life. An International celebration of what would have been his hundred and sixth birthday is being pre-recorded in Florida and will be shown to parishioners in Tennessee the following weekend.  There will be refreshments and even a cake contest to bring in the festivities locally.

Born in Tilden, Nebraska to a career Naval Officer, Lt. Harry Ross Hubbard, and the well-educated Ledora May, Hubbard had memories of “…being insufferably hot in a swing in an Oklahoma yard…of watching bluebirds from a tent at the ‘Old Homestead’…of Dad carefully abstaining from water when the car broke down in a limitless Nevada desert, of rain at night in San Diego, of my Uncle Bob’s coffee store in Tacoma, of the awful abyss below the curling mountain roads of the Rockies, of, in short, many cities, many country sides…and all this before I was ten.”  

After becoming America’s youngest Eagle Scout at the age of 13, Hubbard went on to become an accomplished pilot, a master mariner, a photographer, a prolific writer of stories for pulp fiction magazines (which funded his research into the mind and life) and a Captain in the US Navy during World War II.

Hubbard’s journeys through the Far East and the Caribbean brought him face to face with many different kinds of people, fueling his drive to solve the riddles of life and enable all to achieve happiness, spiritual awareness and success in life.   How he took what he learned from these adventures and arranged this knowledge into what would become Dianetics and Scientology is available on-line as an interactive biography at www.lronhubbard.org.

Scientologists around the world gather to celebrate Mr. Hubbard’s birthday each year in a special celebration where they hear stories from people who knew him while he was alive, and celebrate advances made in churches across the world.

“We are celebrating the wonderful gifts L. Ron Hubbard gave mankind,” said Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology. “Mr. Hubbard’s writings bring a lot of hope for a better world, and a way to accomplish that.  We are honored to host this event.”


Learn more about L. Ron Hubbard and his work at www.lronhubbard.org and www.scientology.org

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Pastor Releases New Publication on Freedom

The Pastor of the Church of Scientology in Nashville recently unveiled a new publication during a special service in observance of World Interfaith Harmony Week.

“Without freedom of religion, or freedom of thought, freedom itself cannot exist,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology. Rev. Fesler recently organized an interfaith service for the community in observance of World Interfaith Harmony Week, and during the celebration, he unveiled a new publication from the Church’s International Office on Freedom of Religion.

The booklet, which includes authoritative texts from international human rights treaties on the subject of religious freedom, contains what any person might want to know to protect their rights to practice their religion in peace and harmony.  The booklet is available in seventeen languages, is downloadable from the website scientologyreligion.org, and contains chapters on the Rights of Parents and Children, Freedom from Discrimination, and the Rights of Employers, Employees and Volunteers.

“These are times that call for all of us to be united as one, not stand apart,” said Rev. Fesler, who was excited to bring together the many faiths represented during the service for World Interfaith Harmony Week. “There are issues in this world that affect all of us--crime, drugs, human trafficking--we need to come together and learn about the religious other.”

During the service, members from several faith traditions spoke about why it is important to their faith and to them that all people come together in unity. In this way, the service helped provide a means to showcase religious freedom in its purity. The faiths represented included Sikhs, Baha’is, Baptists, Latter-day Saints, Scientologists, Buddhists, Catholics, and Muslims.

“It is part of our very fabric to support others’ rights and abilities to practice their religion in peace, and that is what we lifted up through the service,” said Rev. Fesler.

For more information about Scientology, its practices or beliefs, visit scientology.org.


The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Helping Communities

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is working to help communities across Nashville.

The Way to Happiness, a book written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, is comprised of 21 precepts, each one predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. In the three decades since it was authored, more than 115 million copies of the book passed hand to hand, thus inspiring the international movement which is spreading throughout Nashville, TN.

Volunteers for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have been working to get the booklet into the hands of every Nashvillian through a series of events. This past weekend, a group of volunteers distributed more than two hundred booklets to households near downtown Nashville.

"This book is based on common sense principles and acts as a moral compass,” says Judy Young, Director of The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee, “when people read it, they are able to easily put the concepts in it into practice to live a better life.”

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.” In the three decades since it was authored, 100 million copies of the book passed hand to hand.


TWTH-TN is making a true impact across Tennessee and reaching other parts of the world. To learn more about the program, or to order copies of The Way to Happiness booklet, visit twthtn.org. 

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Hosts Holocaust Event, Sparks Discussion

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) held a special briefing on The Holocaust: What They Don’t Want You to Know in observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day.


The UN General Assembly designated January 27—the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau—as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. “On this annual day of commemoration, the UN urges every member state to honor the victims of the Nazi era and to develop educational programs to help prevent future genocides,” according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s website.

This is why the Citizens Commission on Human Rights chose this day to present a special briefing on “The Holocaust: What They Don’t Want You to Know.” A special video was played which showed the atrocities committed in the early 1940s under the Nazi regime and exactly whose ideas led to the Holocaust. After seeing the video, attendees went into immediate discussion about the implications the video showed for how these same people are affecting people in the current day.

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  


Nashville Church of Scientology Brings People of Faith Together in Unity

The Church of Scientology in Nashville opened its doors to all religious communities for a special service in observance of World Interfaith Harmony Week.

Unity was the watchword on February 1st at the Nashville Church of Scientology, where leaders held an interfaith service to help bring people together. “These are times that call for all of us to be united as one, not stand apart,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the church and organizer of the interfaith service, “Everyone in this room has a different background, a different faith tradition, but they are all my friends.”  

Hate graffiti, death threats, and violence toward people of religion have become recurrent mainstream news. As recently as January 9th, the Washington Post reports that the “FBI is looking into bomb threats at Jewish centers in the United States...”

“In order to truly combat religious discrimination in this day and age, we have to come together and learn about the religious other,” says Rev. Fesler.

During the service, members from several faith traditions spoke about why it is important to their faith and to them that all people come together in unity. The faiths represented included Sikhs, Baha’is, Baptists, Latter-day Saints, Scientologists, Buddhists, Catholics, and Muslims.

The service was held in observance of World Interfaith Harmony Week, the first week of February, which was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in a resolution adopted on 20 October 2010. In the resolution, the General Assembly points out that mutual understanding and interreligious dialogue constitute important dimensions of a culture of peace and establishes World Interfaith Harmony Week as a way to promote harmony between all people regardless of their faith, according to UN.org.

The Church of Scientology’s creed begins with the words: “We of the Church believe that all men of whatever race, color or creed were created with equal rights; that all men have inalienable rights to their own religious practices and their performance…”   

“It is part of our very fabric to support others’ rights and abilities to practice their religion in peace, so that is what we are lifting up through this service,” says Rev. Fesler.

For more information about Scientology, its practices or beliefs, visit scientology.org.


Thursday, January 26, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Hosts World Interfaith Harmony Service

The Church of Scientology in Nashville is opening its doors to all religious communities for a special service in observance of World Interfaith Harmony Week.

Hate graffiti, death threats, and violence toward people of religion have become recurrent mainstream news. Even as of January 9th, the Washington Post reports that the “FBI is looking into bomb threats at Jewish centers in the United States...”

“In order to truly combat religious discrimination in this day and age, we have to come together and learn about the religious other,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, Pastor of the Church of Scientology, who has called together people of many different faiths and cultures to take part in a service for World Interfaith Harmony Week.

Rev. Fesler is passionate about bringing together all peoples and has reached out to many different faith leaders for this special service. “Everyone, regardless of their race, religion, culture—everyone deserves to have a voice, to live in peace, and to practice their religion in harmony with the rest of mankind,” he says.

The Church of Scientology’s creed begins with the words: “We of the Church believe that all men of whatever race, color or creed were created with equal rights; that all men have inalienable rights to their own religious practices and their performance…”   

“It is part of our very fabric to support others’ rights and abilities to practice their religion in peace, so that is what we are lifting up through this service,” says Rev. Fesler.

The World Interfaith Harmony Service will take place on February 1, 2017 from 4:30 – 6:30pm in the Church of Scientology community hall in Nashville, Tenn. Participating religious peoples include Jews, Muslims, Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, Scientologists and more.


For more information about Scientology, its practices or beliefs, visit scientology.org. 

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Tennessee United for Human Rights Participates at Nashville MLK Day Event

Tennessee United for Human Rights (TUHR) has the mission to bring awareness and education on the 30 human rights, as listed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, to people all across the state.

“The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. federal holiday is a perfect opportunity for Americans to honor Dr. King’s legacy through service. [The day] empowers individuals, strengthens communities, bridges barriers, creates solutions to social problems, and moves us closer to Dr. King’s vision of a beloved community,” according to NationalService.gov. It is with this in mind that Tennessee United for Human Rights (TUHR) went out to join in the movement in Nashville to honor Dr. King’s legacy.

TUHR, which was formed as a non-profit public benefit corporation in 2015 to educate Tennesseans on the basic principles and foundations of human rights, was part of events in Nashville to honor the iconic human rights hero. The main event is the MLK Day march and convocation which took place at Tennessee State University on Monday. The march began at 10am at Jefferson Street Baptist Church. According to MLKDayNashville.com, the theme for 2017 was “What’s Next… There’s Power in Progress.”

One TUHR volunteer says the organization is excited about being part of these events and is anxious to spread education on human rights, “This is the time for everyone to learn their basic human rights and be united in the fight for freedom.”

TUHR is the local chapter of United for Human Rights, an international, not-for-profit organization dedicated to implementing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Its membership is comprised of individuals, educators and groups throughout the world who are actively forwarding the knowledge and protection of human rights by and for all Mankind, according to humanrights.com.

United for Human Rights was founded on the Declaration’s 60th anniversary, in the face of continued worldwide abuses which violate the spirit, intent and Articles of this charter of all human rights, the first such document ever ratified by the community of nations. For more information about United for Human Rights, go to www.humanrights.com.


Monday, January 9, 2017

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Presents The Holocaust: What They Don’t Want You to Know

Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) is holding a special briefing on The Holocaust: What They Don’t Want You to Know in observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

The UN General Assembly designated January 27—the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau—as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. “On this annual day of commemoration, the UN urges every member state to honor the victims of the Nazi era and to develop educational programs to help prevent future genocides,” according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s website. So it is that the Citizens Commission on Human Rights chose this day to present a special briefing on “The Holocaust: What They Don’t Want You to Know,” which takes place at 5pm at the Nashville Church of Scientology.

The event will look at the atrocities committed in the early 1940s under the Nazi regime and show exactly whose ideas led to the Holocaust.

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”


CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Friday, January 6, 2017

2016 Year in Review – Citizens Commission on Human Rights, Nashville Chapter

2016 saw the expansion of the Citizens Commission on Human Rights, Nashville Chapter, carrying out the work of the international organization in the Southeast United States.

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) Nashville Chapter began the year with a special event held in honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day where chapter members posed the question, “If Hitler was behind the Holocaust, who was behind Hitler?” Church of Scientology pastor, Rev. Brian Fesler, was glad to host this event, which he opened by saying, “We remember [the Holocaust] so we can mourn the loss, we remember so we can honor the lives, but more than that we remember so we can prevent.” A video was played to attendees which revealed how the pseudoscience Eugenics contributed to the Holocaust, and exactly who propagated these ideas.

Next, Nashville Chapter members traveled to Atlanta, Georgia, to join other civil rights and social justice groups in protesting the American Psychiatric Convention. Representatives of the NAACP, the Nation of Islam, 10,000 Fearless Men, Black Lives Matter and Concerned Black Clergy joined CCHR in protesting the use of the controversial ECT (Electro-Convulsive Therapy, also known as electroshock treatment) on children. ECT is an “archaic technique invented in the 1930s, [which] sends jolts of electricity into the brain, inducing a seizure. It’s associated with numerous side-effects, including short and long-term memory loss, cognitive problems, unwanted personality changes, manic symptoms, prolonged seizures, heart problems and death,” according to Natural News.

CCHR Nashville then took its message of human rights for those being abused in the field of mental illness to a community event in the Edgehill neighborhood and to events for parents and educators. Volunteers distributed fliers and spoke to people who have been victims of abuse in psychiatric hands.

Then, volunteers were out at a national music and arts festival and soon after participated in a cultural festival, shining a light on psychiatric abuse and spreading the word.

In October, to observe World Mental Health Day, CCHR held a special “Lunch and Learn” with a health and wellness doctor. During the seminar, she was able to bring awareness to parents on children’s mental and physical health needs, especially what to do if a child is experiencing health issues, and what parents can do to help their children be at a more optimum health level. She discussed societal norms where people are given a pill, and how that merely masks the problem without fixing it.

Rev. Fesler, who also serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are excited about all of the activity in 2016, but there is much more work to be done. People are getting hurt every day at the hands of psychiatrists. They must be brought to account for their actions.”


CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health industry watchdog whose mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health.  It works to ensure patient and consumer protections are enacted and upheld as there is rampant abuse in the field of mental health.  In this role, CCHR has helped to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive mental health practices since it was formed five decades ago. For more information on CCHR, visit cchrnashville.org.