Thursday, June 22, 2017

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Participates at Event for Father’s Day

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work to spread information to parents on their basic rights so they can help their children. 

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) is working to educate parents on their basic rights as they relate to their children’s mental health and well-being. To do this, volunteers have been to several recent events and informational fairs, and now have recently participated in Father’s Day celebrations in Nashville.

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

During a local event for Father’s Day, volunteers were able to distribute materials and talk with parents about their rights.

Rev. Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out, but there is so much work to be done. People are getting hurt every day at the hands of psychiatrists.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Helps Fathers with Truth

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World. Recently, volunteers were getting out information during a Father’s Day celebration.  


“When it comes to people’s lives being ruined by drugs and addiction, the news is just non-stop,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” he says.

For this very reason, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) was out in the neighborhood for a Father’s Day celebration this past weekend distributing materials and spreading the word. “Fathers are an important role model and it’s incredibly important that they get the truth about drugs so they can pass this on to their children,” says Fesler.

During the event, volunteers were able to distribute dozens of pamphlets and informational brochures to parents and children.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.”

For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org.


The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Helps Fathers Learn Values

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee participated in a celebration for Father’s Day.

“Honor and Help Your Parents,” is but one precept from the common sense guide The Way to Happiness, but it is with this in mind that volunteers from The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee were out in the community for a Father’s Day celebration to distribute copies of the booklet to parents and children alike.

The Way to Happiness, which was written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, sparked a movement and has been reprinted and passed hand to hand to a wide variety of cultures and peoples.

In Tennessee, The Way to Happiness Association has been working to spread its message even further. The reason? Organizers for the group say where it is distributed crime rates plummet, as proven by statistics.

“This book spreads a calmness that is unparalleled by anything else. It contains common sense moral messages that anyone can agree with and apply,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, the regional coordinator for the program.

During the Father’s Day event in Nashville, The Way to Happiness Volunteers were able to see dozens of parents and children and get them their copy of the booklet

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.” Acting as a resource center to assist the public with distribution projects bringing about needed changes in businesses, communities and entire regions, the Way to Happiness Foundation is supported by a growing global network of The Way to Happiness offices that forward the book into circulation across all sectors of society. As a result, people world over—from heads of state, mayors and CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to doctors, lawyers, local business leaders and community heads—are now using The Way to Happiness to reverse the current moral decline.

To date, some 100 million copies of The Way to Happiness have been distributed in more than 114 languages and in over 170 countries. For more information, visit twthtn.org.


Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Nashville Religion Communicators Council Sets August Meeting

The Nashville Chapter of the Religion Communicators Council (RCC) has just set an August business meeting to form a nominating committee for chapter officers. 


The Religion Communicators Council (RCC), founded in 1929, is an interfaith association of religion communicators at work in print and electronic communication, marketing and public relations. Members of the RCC come from many different religions and backgrounds including Christianity, Judaism, Baha’i Faith, Islam and Scientology, among others. 

The Nashville Chapter has just announced that it will hold an August business meeting, in part to select a nominating committee which will be charged with creating a slate of officers for a 2018-2019 term.

Since 2014, the Nashville executive committee has consisted of Rev. Brian Fesler, Pastor of the Church of Scientology, as President; Drew Pope, former Public Affairs Director for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints as Vice President for Programs; Royya James, Conference Relations Coordinator of United Methodist Communications as Treasurer; Julie Brinker, Director of Community Affairs for the Church of Scientology as Communications Coordinator; and Aisha Lbhalla of the Tennessee Muslim Women’s Council as Membership Officer. 

Rev. Fesler says, “Our chapter has thrived with this diverse group of religious leaders, but now it is time to see who else in the Nashville community would like an opportunity to lead this excellent group of religious communicators. Nashville is filled with potential, especially in the ever-growing diversity of the city which includes the religious sector, and I think there are many who would like to take the helm of this organization to help it grow into the future.” 

Since 2015, the Nashville chapter has met every other month with a series called “Building Bridges Over Bagels,” during which members would discuss current issues of interest to people of faith and what they could do to overcome division together. This series proved very popular with members, and is something Fesler says he would like to see the next administration build on and carry forward. 

For more information or to attend an upcoming meeting, visit religioncommunicators.org/nashville-chapter. 


Citizens Commission on Human Rights Helping Fathers

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work spreading information to parents on their basic rights so they can help their children. 

This past weekend, Metro Nashville Public Schools recognized males and the positive impact they make in the lives of children every day with a Fatherhood Festival. The event welcomed MNPS fathers, grandfathers, uncles, brothers, mentors and other men to spend a day of family fun including games, activities, music and food at the event. The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) took part in the event with a booth to help educate parents on their basic rights related to children’s mental health and well-being. 

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Rev. Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are eager to spread the word to everyone to know their mental health rights, as there is so much abuse in this field. People are getting hurt every day at the hands of psychiatrists.”

Volunteers at the Fatherhood Festival reached scores of parents and community and political leaders. “Our volunteers will go anywhere, and see anyone to spread the word. Just contact us if you would like more information,” says Fesler. 

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Prepares for Third Annual Friendship Day Dialogue

International Day of Friendship was created to inspire peace and bridge building. At the end of July, the Church of Scientology will bring together a diverse crowd to dialogue for the occasion. 
  
Terror attacks in London, Iran, Manchester – this is not the news people need to hear on a daily basis. Yet, this is the case in the world today.

To combat events like these, the Nashville Church of Scientology is working with other churches and community organizations to plan an event with dialogue and activity aimed at raising awareness and friendship among even the most diverse peoples.

The occasion is the International Day of Friendship, an observance dignified in 2011 by the United Nations General Assembly with the idea that “friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities,” according to un.org.

The resolution emphasizes that young people, as future leaders, can be brought together in activities with different cultures. This promotes international understanding and respect for diversity.

The Church of Scientology will hold its third annual dialogue for the day at the end of July, and will help people participate and learn about those with whom they might not otherwise associate.

Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Church of Scientology says, “This event is needed. There are too many problems arising from basic misunderstanding that could be cleared up with honest and open communication.”

The Church of Scientology is involved in this effort through its community betterment program, The Way to Happiness. Based on the book of the same name by L. Ron Hubbard, the program is predicated on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others—and that without the survival of others, neither joy nor happiness are attainable. Several concepts in the book promote dialogue and friendship. Among them, “Respect the Religious Beliefs of Others,” “Be Worthy of Trust,” and “Try to Treat Others As You Would Want them to Treat You.”


For more information on the Church of Scientology, its programs or upcoming events, visit scientology-ccnashville.org. 

Tennessee Scientologist Works to Combat Drug Abuse

Scientologists are standing up against rampant drug abuse, and providing educational materials to prevent an epidemic.

There is a public health crisis in Tennessee: prescription drug abuse. According to a Tennessean article from last month, there are now more opioid prescriptions than there are people in the state, making it the second highest rate of prescriptions per capita in the nation. And if that sounds like bad news, that’s not even the worst of it. Overdose death has gone up 300% over the last two decades, with nearly 1500 deaths in 2015 alone.

That is why Tennessee Scientologist Brian Fesler is working with Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) to prevent drug abuse and educate young people before it is too late.



Fesler, regional coordinator for DFT, said, “We are working to prevent an epidemic, but we will need all shoulders to the wheel if we are going to make an effective change.”  The organization is planning a series of events throughout summer to educate people on the dangers of street drugs. Insiders are calling it a “summer slam on drug abuse.”

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has the mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. While FDFW is not a religious organization, many Scientologists support it, as it is a core belief of the Scientology religion to be free of drugs.

Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee and to follow the events throughout the summer, visit drugfreetn.org.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Drug-Free Tennessee Keeping Youth Off Drugs

Drug-Free Tennessee is preparing for International Day Against Drug Abuse with several educational events culminating in a training workshop about keeping young people away from drugs.

Keeping Youth off Drugs has long been the message of Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT). The group has promoted a drug-free life with education and prevention materials for young people. According to drugfreetn.org, it has reached more than 18,000 people across Tennessee in the last five years. But now DFT is going full throttle ahead and wants to get this message out to the masses.

So throughout the month of June, the group will be hitting the streets passing out the Truth About Drugs booklets, which enlighten all ages on the dangers of common street drugs. Then, on International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, the group will be having a training workshop titled “How to Keep Our Youth Off Drugs.” During the free workshop, attendees will get information on exactly what to say and show to their kids to help steer them clear of a life of addiction.

The International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking was created by the UN General Assembly in December 1987 to encourage all sectors of society to work together to tackle drug abuse and addiction.

DFT is the local chapter for the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, an international non-profit organization aimed at providing children the truth about drugs so they are equipped with correct information and won’t become a victim to dealer’s lies. DFT has visited over 30 counties across Tennessee providing informational seminars and lectures for school children and other groups.


“How to Keep Our Youth Off Drugs” takes place on June 26th at the Nashville Church of Scientology, 1130 8th Ave South. For more information, or to RSVP, visit DrugFreeTN.EventBrite.com. 

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Greening Up the Edgehill Community Garden

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee had a community cleanup for World Environment Day on June 5, 2017 and successfully cleaned up the Edgehill Community Garden.

According to Nashville.gov, $11 million in taxpayer dollars are spent picking up the trash that Tennesseans throw on the ground. To help keep Nashville beautiful, The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) had a neighborhood cleanup event for World Environment Day on June 5, 2017. The cleanup was dubbed “Green It Up,” as part of an ongoing campaign by the organization to make the city of Nashville greener with less litter.

In 2016, TWTH-TN invited environmental activists and leaders to a roundtable discussion in observance of World Environment Day under the heading “It’s Your City – Green It Up.” This year, organizers went to the streets with this message, holding a cleanup event in the Edgehill Community Garden.

Youth from TWTH Kids Club met in the Church of Scientology’s Public Information Center to learn why it is important to safeguard and improve the environment. This is a precept from the book The Way to Happiness, the inspiration for the organization which was founded with the same name.

The Way To Happiness book was written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard and has a total of twenty-one precepts based on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others.

World Environment Day occurs each year on June 5th and is celebrated by the United Nations. According to unep.org, World Environment Day “…has grown to be a broad, global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated by stakeholders in over 100 countries. It also serves as the ‘people’s day’ for doing something positive for the environment, galvanizing individual actions into a collective power that generates an exponential positive impact on the planet.”

For more information on “Green It Up,” or if you would like to participate in future events, visit twthtn.org.






Thursday, May 25, 2017

Citizens Commission on Human Rights to Participate at Father’s Day Event

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work to spread information to parents on their basic rights so they can help their children.

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) is working to educate parents on their basic rights as they relate to their children’s mental health and well-being. To do this, volunteers have been to several recent events and informational fairs, and now are preparing to participate in Father’s Day celebrations in Nashville.

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially as relates to patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Rev. Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out, but there is so much work to be done. People are getting hurt every day at the hands of psychiatrists.”


CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee to Take Part in Father’s Day Celebration

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee will be participating in a celebration for Father’s Day.

“Honor and Help Your Parents,” is but one precept from the common sense guide The Way to Happiness, but it is with this in mind that volunteers from The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee will be out in the community for a Father’s Day celebration to distribute copies of the booklet to parents and children alike.

The Way to Happiness, which was written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s, sparked a movement and has been reprinted and passed hand to hand to a wide variety of cultures and peoples.

In Tennessee, The Way to Happiness Association has been working to spread its message even further. The reason? Organizers for the group say where it is distributed crime rates plummet, as proven by statistics.

“This book spreads a calmness that is unparalleled by anything else. It contains common sense moral messages that anyone can agree with and apply,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, the regional coordinator for the program.

According to thewaytohappiness.org, “This code of conduct can be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed and works to restore the bonds that unite humankind.” In the three decades since it was authored, some 80 million copies of the book passed hand to hand.


For more information, visit twthtn.org.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee Says ‘Green It Up’

The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee is inviting friends and neighbors to a community cleanup for World Environment Day in June.


Leaders for The Way to Happiness Association of Tennessee (TWTH-TN) have announced a neighborhood cleanup event for World Environment Day. The cleanup has been dubbed “Green It Up,” as part of an ongoing campaign by the organization to make the city of Nashville greener with less litter.

In 2016, TWTH-TN invited environmental activists and leaders to a roundtable discussion in observance of World Environment Day under the heading “It’s Your City – Green It Up.” This year, organizers are taking this message to the streets.

The “Green It Up” cleanup will take place on June 3rd at 10am. Volunteers will meet in the community hall of the Church of Scientology for cleanup supplies and refreshments.

The Way to Happiness Association wants the Green It Up campaign to bring people together who care about the environment so they can connect and can do bigger things. TWTH was formed around the book The Way To Happiness, written by humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard, which has twenty-one precepts based on the fact that one’s survival depends on the survival of others. One of these precepts is “Safeguard and Improve the Environment,” which takes to heart the care for the planet.

World Environment Day occurs each year on June 5th and is celebrated by the United Nations. According to unep.org, World Environment Day “…has grown to be a broad, global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated by stakeholders in over 100 countries. It also serves as the ‘people’s day’ for doing something positive for the environment, galvanizing individual actions into a collective power that generates an exponential positive impact on the planet.”

For more information on “Green It Up,” or if you would like to participate, send an email to twthnashville@gmail.com.


Drug-Free Tennessee Plans All-Out Effort for International Day Against Drug Abuse

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, and is planning a series of large-scale events for the 2017 International Day Against Drug Abuse.

In just the past week, news about drug abuse is rampant across Tennessee: a Tullahoma High School band co-director was arrested for the manufacture and sale of drugs, a Tennessee man was arrested for selling kratom, a Hendersonville nurse was arrested and accused of selling Xanax bars, and in Grainger County, 30 people were indicted in a drug roundup.

“When it comes to people’s lives being ruined by drugs and addiction, the news is just non-stop,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” he says.

For this very reason, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) has been working to organize a series of events in honor of International Day Against Drug Abuse, which takes place each year on June 26. “We have about 5 events planned so far,” says Fesler, but his group has high goals to educate people and intends to meet them.

International Day Against Drug Abuse was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1987. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime is leading a global campaign to raise awareness about the major challenge that illicit drugs represent to society as a whole, and especially to the young. The goal of the campaign is to mobilize support and inspire people to act against drug use, according to unodc.org.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.” For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org. 

Friday, May 12, 2017

Tennessee Scientologist Stands Up for Patients’ Rights

Scientologists are standing up for the rights of those who aren’t able to stand up for themselves.

In Tennessee, Scientologists are outspoken about helping those being abused in the mental health field. They work with the Nashville chapter of Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR Nashville) to help victims of psychiatric abuse document their cases and file complaints.

On the CCHRNashville.org website, the question is posed: “Victim of Brain Stimulation?” followed by the text, “Do you know someone who has been damaged by experimental psychiatric treatments including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS) or any other electric shock or magnetic wave to the brain? Report abuse.”

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out and finding more and more people coming forward with stories of abuse. They are working hard every day to help those who have been hurt at the hands of psychiatrists.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. It was founded in 1969 by the Church of Scientology with the mission to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. Fesler says, “CCHR has supporters from many faiths.  Human rights abuse doesn’t discriminate and neither do we.”


CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Nashville Hubbard Dianetics Foundation Celebrates 67th Anniversary

The Adventure of Dianetics began 67 years ago.

For anyone who has experienced self-doubt, depression, anxiety or unreasonable fears, the book Dianetics: the Modern Science of Mental Health is the resource to turn to for answers and guidance. This book was authored and published in 1950, launching a movement for Man to know and help himself.

L. Ron Hubbard began the book with these words, “Dianetics is an adventure. It is an exploration into Terra Incognita, the human mind, that vast and hitherto unknown realm half an inch back of our foreheads.” He further invited readers to “Treat it as an adventure. And may you never be the same again.” Millions have done just that.

To commemorate this anniversary, the Nashville Church of Scientology is holding a Dianetics anniversary celebration this week to share news of the application of Dianetics technology across the South. Awards will be given to those who have done the most to spread the message contained within, those who have counseled others using the materials, and to groups who have helped great numbers of people.

Now available in over 100 nations and 50 languages, more than 22 million copies of Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health have been sold and it has appeared on at least 116 bestseller lists. Dianetics sparked the movement that ultimately led to the founding of the Scientology religion, the only major religion to emerge in the 20th century. L. Ron Hubbard went on to document his research into the spirit, mind and life in 18 Basic books, thousands of other written materials and nearly 2,500 recorded lectures—the Scripture of Scientology.

Today, L. Ron Hubbard's works are studied and applied daily in over a thousand Dianetics centers, Scientology churches, missions and organizations around the world. The Dianetics Seminar has seen much success in Nashville where it is delivered out of the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, a department within the Church of Scientology.

For more information on Dianetics, visit the Dianetics website at www.Dianetics.org. For an interactive audiovisual overview of the life and works of L. Ron Hubbard, visit www.LRonHubbard.org.


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Tennessee United for Human Rights Offers Speakers for Summer Workshops

Tennessee United for Human Rights, which works under the umbrella of the international organization United for Human Rights, is offering speakers for summer workshops.


Human rights education should never take a summer vacation, according to volunteers with Tennessee United for Human Rights (TNUHR). “Human rights are vital in education and children today need to know what their rights are, so they can educate others, defend their rights and help create a better society,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, the regional coordinator for Tennessee United for Human Rights.

Rev. Fesler recently gave a workshop on Human Rights 101 during the Tennessee Conference on Volunteerism. The workshop was aimed at volunteers, to help them first learn their basic human rights, then enlighten them on how to help others understand their rights, too.

TNUHR leaders have given workshops over summer in past years for organizations such as the Urban League of Middle Tennessee, and are offering similar summer workshops for 2017.

The purpose of TNUHR is to teach people about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. United for Human Rights is a global movement, including hundreds of groups, clubs and chapters around the world.

“Why do we teach people these basic human rights? Because everyone deserves to know,” says Rev. Fesler.


For more information about Tennessee United for Human Rights or Youth for Human Rights, visit tnuhr.org. 

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Can Help Document Abuse

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights of Nashville (CCHR Nashville) has been hard at work to spread information on dangerous practices in the field of mental health and help those who have been abused.

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Nashville Chapter (CCHR Nashville) has been working to help victims of psychiatric abuse by documenting cases. On the CCHRNashville.org website, the question is posed: “Victim of Brain Stimulation?” followed by the text, “Do you know someone who has been damaged by experimental psychiatric treatments including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS) or any other electric shock or magnetic wave to the brain? Report abuse.”

CCHR has long been an advocate for human rights, especially patients’ rights in the field of mental health. Per the international CCHR website, cchr.org, “CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.”

Brian Fesler, who serves on the board of CCHR Nashville, said, “CCHR volunteers are getting the word out and finding more and more people coming forward with stories of abuse. We are working every day to help those who have been hurt at the hands of psychiatrists.”

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR receives reports about abuses in the field of mental health and is especially interested in situations where persons experienced abuse or damage due to a false diagnosis or unwanted and harmful psychiatric treatments, such as psychiatric drugs, electroshock (ECT) and electronic or magnetic brain stimulation (TMS).


CCHR is often able to assist with filing complaints, and can work with a person’s attorney to further investigate the case. To contact CCHR Nashville for more information, visit cchrnashville.org.  

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Celebrates 32nd Anniversary

The Church of Scientology held its 32nd anniversary soiree celebration on April 22nd, 2017 with parishioners and friends from the community.

This past weekend, the Nashville Church of Scientology held a celebration of thirty-two years in Nashville.

Church pastor Rev. Brian Fesler began his speech for the evening with a message of hope, if we work hard in our own sector to make a difference, “The way you manage a global issue is, you team up with others from around the globe who want to handle it. You take responsibility for an area, and team up with others who are doing the same. Then you each clean up yourself, your community, your state, your region. And when you have reached the boundaries of your friends, and they have cleaned up to the borders of their friends, we will have peace and prosperity for all.”   

Community leaders spoke about the Church’s involvement in education initiatives for human rights and about the church’s commitment and involvement in the community.

Then, a special guest pastor from another church delivered a sermon on love, quoting parts of an article by Scientology Founder, L. Ron Hubbard, entitled ‘What is Greatness?’ which begins: “The hardest task one can have is to continue to love his fellows despite all reasons he should not.”  

On a global scale, the Church of Scientology has enjoyed greater expansion during the past decade than in the previous 50 years combined. All the while the Church’s ever-growing humanitarian programs have positively impacted hundreds of millions of lives.

In Nashville, the Church has seen thousands of people entering its doors for the first time since moving into the grand Fall School Building eight years ago. On a humanitarian mission, the Church has participated in numerous human rights awareness events and helped create such events as Human Rights Day and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. march and convocation.  Church members, volunteering in the area of drug education, have delivered more than 230 seminars in schools in Tennessee and have distributed more than 50,000 booklets.

“Scientology is an active religion, where one seeks to know life and help people," says Rev. Fesler, "and we have the tools to accomplish that. We don’t ask our members to believe, we want them to act.”

To learn more about the Church of Scientology, its programs and courses, visit www.scientology.org.   

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Holds ‘Swing Into Health’ Concert

The Nashville Church of Scientology recently held a community concert in observance of World Health Day, called ‘Swing Into Health.’

When a jump-jive swing band comes rolling through Nashville right around World Health Day, it only makes sense that a concert related to healthy living is in order. And that’s exactly what happened during the second week of April when the Jive Aces visited the Church of Scientology for a community concert. Aptly titled “Swing Into Health,” the concert brought people together for a fun evening where they were able to engage with organizations promoting healthy lifestyles such as being drug-free, doing community gardening and finding affordable healthcare.

The Church of Scientology supports the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject. The local chapter, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) hosted the concert to observe World Health Day. 

Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology, says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on how to be healthy—this includes staying away from illegal drugs, and there are many other aspects to health that people should know. By educating people in a fun, upbeat way, they could be more inclined to make healthier choices.”

The Jive Aces, who headlined the concert, are a six piece swing band that has been together for over a decade. The group has performed at thousands of festivals, theatres and events throughout the UK, Europe and USA, as well as Japan, Israel, South Africa, Morocco and the Caribbean, 30 countries in all. The Jive Aces are renowned for their high energy Jump Jive music (the exciting sound where Swing meets Rock ‘n Roll) and spectacular stage show.

According to jiveaces.com, “Having become the first ever band to reach the semifinals of Britain's Got Talent in 2012 following up with a performance for Her Majesty The Queen as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations and performances for both the Olympic and Paralympic celebrations, The Jive Aces have truly established themselves as the UK's top Jive & Swing band.”


For more information on the Church of Scientology or its programs, visit scientology-ccnashville.org. 

Drug-Free Tennessee Engaging with Community at Local Health Fair

Drug-Free Tennessee is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, and has been hard at work spreading its message during events with other organizations.

Within the last month, thousands of dollars’ worth of drugs and cash were seized as part of a multi-agency investigation across middle Tennessee where authorities found marijuana, cocaine, guns and cash at several different homes in residential neighborhoods; nearly $13 million in fentanyl (a narcotic) was seized in a drug bust by police in Decaturville; and just yesterday, three people were arrested in a drug bust that uncovered 15 lbs of cocaine and 2 lbs of heroin.

“When it comes to people’s lives being ruined by drugs and addiction, the news is just non-stop,” says Rev. Brian Fesler, regional coordinator for Drug-Free Tennessee. “We need to spread a positive drug-free message and educate as many people as possible and as fast as possible,” he says.

For this very reason, Drug-Free Tennessee (DFT) has been out in the community educating residents and providing resources.  This past week, volunteers spread the word to neighbors during a community health fair, where they also offered further help in the form of lectures to boys and girls clubs, Sunday school classes and other groups.

DFT is the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW), which is based in Los Angeles and has as its mission to educate people about the dangerous effects of drugs so they understand and can make informed choices on the subject.

Fesler says, “There is a need in our communities to educate everyone on drugs, drugs impact all our lives in one way or another. That’s why we work with others so people can get a complete overview.”

For more information on Drug-Free Tennessee, visit drugfreetn.org.


Thursday, April 6, 2017

Nashville Church of Scientology Opens Its Doors to the Community

The Church of Scientology is preparing to celebrate its 32nd year in Nashville, TN, and with that, is hosting several events for the community at large.  

The Scientology religion came into this world in 1952. As such, members of the Church recognize that as a religion, it is still young when compared to other world religions such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. In a recent interview with pastor of the Nashville Church, Rev. Brian Fesler said he enjoys learning about people of other faiths, how they get along in life, and what drew them to their faith calling. “When you look at all of the diverse people of this world, it is actually very beautiful that each individual person can find a religion that gives them a path, and a calling to be able to benefit spiritually in this very materialistic world,” he said.

Rev. Fesler went on to speak about how people find Scientology, “People are naturally very curious about Scientology. We accept all kinds of people for classes and spiritual counseling. People come and go, sometimes they read a book or try an introductory course and then we’ll hear from them three years later.  Others find quickly that Scientology is the path that makes the most sense to them, and they often become members of the church.  Either way, Scientology is here to stay, and we will be here for them any time.”

The Nashville Church of Scientology will celebrate its 32nd anniversary with a private event at the end of April. But coming this week, the church is opening its doors with a community concert in honor of World Health Day. The concert will take place in the church’s community event hall. Rev. Fesler says he expects around 80 to attend that evening. “Since we opened our doors in the beautiful Fall School building, we’ve welcomed community members to a variety of events, shows and classes. Many thousands of people have come into our building, and learned more about what we do. Some have taken a class or two, and some have just enjoyed the beautiful architecture. What is most meaningful to me is that these people have opened themselves up to learn what Scientology is all about – to see for themselves, not base an opinion on hearsay or what they see in the media.”

“Scientology is an active religion, where one seeks to know life and help people," says Rev. Fesler, "and we thrive on positive results.” To learn more about the Church of Scientology, its programs and courses, visit www.scientology.org.  

Religion Communicators Council Explores the Proliferation of Channels of Communication

How does one contribute to his faith? Some take up the calling to be a minister, imam, rabbi or priest while others might take time to volunteer or give weekly donations. There’s a certain class of people who have taken up a unique calling: communication.

The Religion Communicators Council (RCC) is an interfaith organization more than 80 years old which has members from many faith traditions, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Baha’i, Scientology, Hinduism, Buddhism and more. Members of the RCC make it their job to communicate on behalf of their tradition, to spread the good news and encourage good deeds throughout the world.

Each year, a national convention is held for all RCC members across the United States. It is a time to come together as one, to celebrate excellence in communication, and gain ideas and inspiration.  The 2017 conference took place in April in Chicago, Illinois.  RCC members gathered under the theme "Virtually Here, There and Everywhere: Faith Communications and Presence," alluding to the myriad channels of communication in today’s world, and how to best utilize those channels in engaging an audience or disseminating information.  It was held at Crowne Plaza Hotel and consisted of a long weekend of activities and workshops from Thursday to Saturday.

The convention opened with a plenary by Rev. Myron McCoy, Senior Pastor at First United Methodist Church at the Chicago; Angela Cowser, Associate Professor of the Sociology of Religion, Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary; Rami Nashashibi, Executive Director, Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN); and the Honorable Toni Preckwinckle, the President of the Cook County Board of Commissioners.  They took time to speak to the topic “Guns into Plowshares, Presence into Hope: On Violence and Faith.”

During the first evening of the convention, the annual DeRose Hinkhouse awards were presented to active members of RCC who demonstrate excellence in religious communications and public relations. The most prestigious honor were the Best of Class awards, and among the winners were Christie R. House, General Board of Global Ministries for the United Methodist Church with the New World Outlook Magazine; Anuttama Dasa with ISKCON Communications for The Joy of Devotion; and to Steven D. Martin with the National Council of Churches for the National Council of Churches Podcast.

Religion Communicators heard from experts on social media, media engagement, making podcasts, getting accreditation, seeing theater as communication, creating material specific to young people, building a blog, handling a crisis, and countering hate movements.

The convention concluded Saturday evening with the presentation of the Wilbur Awards, recognizing the work of individuals in secular media who communicate religious issues, values and themes with the utmost professionalism, fairness and honesty. Award winners for this prestigious honor included The Associated Press, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, CBS News, National Geographic, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly, and the Commercial Appeal (Memphis, Tennessee). Hidden Figures, the 20th Century Fox production about the African-American women behind astronaut John Glenn's historic space launch was presented this award as well as Roots, the History Channel's remake of Alex Haley's portrait of American slavery; and black-ish, ABC-TV's comedy about a black family's search for cultural identity. Photos and the full list of winners are available on the Wilbur Awards page of the RCC website.

The Religion Communicators Council (RCC), founded in 1929, is an interfaith association of religion communicators at work in print and electronic communication, marketing and in public relations. Members of the RCC come from many different religions and backgrounds including Christianity, Judaism, Baha’i, Hinduism, Scientology, Buddhist, Sikh and Islam among others.

For more information about the RCC or the annual convention, including a complete list of DeRose Hinkhouse and Wilbur Award winners, visit religioncommunicators.org.



Thursday, March 23, 2017

Inspirational Birthday Celebration Features Past, Present and Future Legacy of L. Ron Hubbard

To celebrate his March 13, 1911 birthday, each year Scientologists from sixty countries gather at the religion’s spiritual nexus in Clearwater, Florida in a weekend celebration of their founder’s life. This gathering and speeches is videoed, then re-shown in churches around the world the following weekend.

In Nashville, the Church members came together with guests and friends to see the many accomplishments and cast their eyes toward a limitless future, inspired by the life and works of L. Ron Hubbard.

LRH, as his multitudinous followers know him, was a polymath—a person of wide-ranging knowledge and education. Beginning as the youngest Eagle Scout in American history (awarded just days after his thirteenth birthday), LRH explored the religious landscape of Asia by the time he was fifteen. Mr. Hubbard went on to become the Guinness Book’s most translated author, and also holds their record for most audio books by one author.

His work toward the salvation of mankind continues to inspire millions worldwide. This annual weekend celebration displays by turns, his research into man as a spiritual being, his technical legacy that allows others to identify, explore and realize their innate spiritual abilities—all this L. Ron Hubbard left to a troubled world.

The evening presented not just a sense of L. Ron Hubbard’s influence on the lives of individuals, but also a surge of real-life stories on how he touched others… if only for just a little while, but ultimately changed the outcome of their destiny.

The night’s spotlight continuously shone on the size and scope of Scientology today, spirited by L. Ron Hubbard’s legacy. His legacy was exquisitely personified in the unveiling of the newest Ideal Organization (Org) in Auckland, New Zealand. The Kiwi congregation formed the second Church of Scientology in the world in 1955. Attendees next witnessed the moving grand opening ceremony with local luminaries heralding the moment as a sea of change for their island nation.

The evening was a celebration of a life well lived—a life lived for the benefit of all mankind, and a life lived to help individuals without hesitation. Birthdays are traditionally a time to acknowledge what a person has done and how they influence the lives of others. But as LRH is transcendent, his birthday celebration ultimately captured what his life and work will continue to mean for the future.

In all, it was a celebration in the name of helping people honor their own potential—of making a world that mankind desires, that he deserves.


Thursday, March 16, 2017

Stress? Anxiety? Depression? The Hubbard Dianetics Seminar Has the Answer

The Hubbard Dianetics Foundation offers a weekly seminar to help people resolve problems, discover the source of unreasonable fears and insecurities, and overcome barriers in life.

How can depression be relieved, or prevented altogether? With Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, everyday people are finding a solution without the use of drugs or medication.

Since 2009, people from Nashville and Middle Tennessee have found answers about the mind and have been trained in highly effective techniques to resolve unwanted conditions in their lives. It’s all happened at the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, a department within the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville.

Dianetics is defined as “what the soul is doing to the body through the mind,” and the subject explains how the mind contains a hidden influence that will cause individuals to perform the most insane acts. The techniques of Dianetics were developed by L. Ron Hubbard in the early part of the last century and presented to the world in the bestselling self-help book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

While Dianetics is over sixty years old, this Dianetics seminar is new. It is based on the book and a video series, How to Use Dianetics, consisting of 18 short films which illustrate specific Dianetics principles and techniques. With these films, people new to the subject can easily learn what to expect from a Dianetics session and how to help another using this technology. “The seminar not only helps people become aware of the cause of their problems, but also the ability to handle it,” says the seminar director.

Following the presentation of the first of these films, those attending the seminar immediately put the materials to use, working with other attendees to apply the techniques right there on the spot.  Supervised by trained Dianetics specialists, the seminar participants gain first-hand experience with just how easy it is to resolve the difficulties and pain that life leaves in its wake. Church pastor Rev. Brian Fesler says, “Many people have finished this seminar, and I want everyone to experience the benefits of Dianetics.  It’s not just for members of my church—anyone can have it.”

The two-day Dianetics seminar is offered every weekend at the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre Nashville at 1130 8th Avenue South. For more information, visit www.dianetics.org or call the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation at 615-687-4600.